Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 22nd Jan 2013 21:28 UTC, submitted by lemur2
Linux "If you consider NetApplications' data set, then Linux owns only about 1 percent of the desktop OS market and Windows has almost 92 percent. But if you consider all computing platforms, including mobile, than Windows has only 20 percent and Linux has 42 percent - and that would be in the form of Google's Android alone." No more or less legitimate than claiming Windows owns 92% of the market. It's all a matter of perspective.
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RE[5]: Amazing
by lemur2 on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 08:58 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Amazing"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

"
Actually, you can make apps that are OS independent. Doing this with Qt/QML/Qtquick as a basis is exactly what they are trying to achieve with this initiative:


At the source level not binaries and that's not what I was talking about at all. Doesn't change what I said and it doesn't make Android anymore Linux in the traditional sense. Seriously you try really hard to troll.
"

Distribution of binaries is not a problem. If you have source level compatibility, then a developer need only write source code for an app once and have it immediately ready for distribution on multiple platforms.

That is the crux of the matter.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Amazing
by 0brad0 on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 09:14 in reply to "RE[5]: Amazing"
0brad0 Member since:
2007-05-05


Distribution of binaries is not a problem. If you have source level compatibility, then a developer need only write source code for an app once and have it immediately ready for distribution on multiple platforms.

That is the crux of the matter.


Distribution of the binaries isn't the issue. You can't take a binary from Ubuntu/Red Hat, etc and run it on Android. They're different OS's. Trying to imply they are one and the same is nonsense.

Edited 2013-01-23 09:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Amazing
by lemur2 on Wed 23rd Jan 2013 10:16 in reply to "RE[6]: Amazing"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"
Distribution of binaries is not a problem. If you have source level compatibility, then a developer need only write source code for an app once and have it immediately ready for distribution on multiple platforms.

That is the crux of the matter.


Distribution of the binaries isn't the issue. You can't take a binary from Ubuntu/Red Hat, etc and run it on Android. They're different OS's. Trying to imply they are one and the same is nonsense.
"

However, you can take source code for an app and compile a binary for Ubuntu and another for Red Hat with the exact same source code. Although the binaries are different, the app itself isn't. Developers don't have to re-write the app for every single Linux platform, in the vast majority of cases a simple re-compile is all that is required.

Reply Parent Score: 1