Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Mar 2013 17:09 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Yesterday, during the most insane launch event in the history of technology, Samsung unveiled its next big flagship, the Galaxy S4. I really couldn't care less about this new phone - another plastic phone that looks exactly like its predecessor - but the flurry of interviews with Samsung executives that followed is far more interesting. With them, Samsung has repositioned Tizen - and if you connect the dots, something interesting is starting to appear.
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Surprise!
by wargum on Sat 16th Mar 2013 10:14 UTC
wargum
Member since:
2006-12-15

Well Thom, I gotta admit you surprised me with this article. I was expecting another baseless article on how Samsung is so scared of Google and wants to be more independent, where being scared is the only argument. But these comments from Samsung officials are pretty interesting.

Still, I don't believe Samsung will push Tizen as hard as some may think. I still see it more like a backup strategy move. I mean, just look at the success Samsung has had with Android over the years. It's phenomenal by any measure! I think they will be pragmatic about it, going forward. As long as Google doesn't p*ss them off, they will happily use Android and sell like crazy. In Tizen itself I still don't see how this offers anything unique from Android other than having some tools for Linux Geeks that Android lacks.

But interesting times, indeed!

Reply Score: 5

RE: Surprise!
by cdude on Sat 16th Mar 2013 11:55 in reply to "Surprise!"
cdude Member since:
2008-09-21

> how this offers anything unique from Android

That's the point. There is or will be no huge difference. Add Touchwiz on top of Tizen and make Android apps run there and you have an Android. Users my not able to tell a difference.

And that is the goal. Samsung took Android and added own gimmicks, inventing on top. They can do the same with Tizen. No difference for the user but with Tizen Samsung has full control of there stack unlike with Android where Google has that control.

Its never good to depend on the good will of some other company. Granted that Samsung's Android dependency is way different then e.g. Nokia's WP dependency cause Samsung has the Android code and licensing allows them to turn that everytime into an own product, to drive forward, to extend from the Kernel to the UI. But its still a competative advantage Google has. They could stop opensourcing newer versions or just publish them month after Moto uses it already.

Watch out what Samsung does here. Its a winning strategy. You need inhouse control of your stack to keep in the game else you end like Nokia.

Edited 2013-03-16 11:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Surprise!
by wannabe geek on Sat 16th Mar 2013 19:10 in reply to "RE: Surprise!"
wannabe geek Member since:
2006-09-27

Granted that Samsung's Android dependency is way different then e.g. Nokia's WP dependency cause Samsung has the Android code and licensing allows them to turn that everytime into an own product, to drive forward, to extend from the Kernel to the UI. But its still a competative advantage Google has. They could stop opensourcing newer versions or just publish them month after Moto uses it already.


I still don't see how this move makes sense. Even if Google took that course, Samsung would just have to maintain an Android fork with no help from Google. Is that really worse than developing something else from scratch?

OTOH, this would make sense if Samsung is planning to do something which is easier in Tizen than in Android for technical reasons rather than licensing ones.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Surprise!
by mutantsushi on Sun 17th Mar 2013 06:02 in reply to "RE: Surprise!"
mutantsushi Member since:
2006-08-18

Priviledging Motorolla is not enough to fend off challenges for Google.
They do need to increase the value of the 'real Android ecosystem',
to prevent all it's best parts, including application library, from being siphoned off.
If they can find other vendors who are willing to play along with Android,
they can pursue a 'Real Android' ecosystem which the best development resources will go into,
and which has separate licences that exclude companies like Samsung who just want to use overly permissive licences like base Android to feed into their own proprietary projects.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Surprise!
by leech on Sun 17th Mar 2013 18:00 in reply to "RE: Surprise!"
leech Member since:
2006-01-10

Watch out what Samsung does here. Its a winning strategy. You need inhouse control of your stack to keep in the game else you end like Nokia.


Funny that you say that, because Nokia DID have their own inhouse control, but they pissed it away...

Reply Parent Score: 3