Linked by Howard Fosdick on Thu 28th Mar 2013 21:49 UTC
Linux Like many OSNews readers, I use Ubuntu. I also use several less popular distros. What is it like to use these lesser-known distros compared to the dominant systems? How does running, say, VectorLinux or Puppy or PC-BSD, differ from using Ubuntu or Fedora? This article offers a few ideas. Obviously, it broadly generalizes about distros for the purpose of discussion.
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RE: Not a distro
by acobar on Thu 28th Mar 2013 22:56 UTC in reply to "Not a distro"
acobar
Member since:
2005-11-15

Can you explain what is the difference? It always seemed like it had the same coupling present on Linux Mint Debian Edition -> Debian (except that PC-BSD is older than LMDE, I think) and we call LMDE a distro.

Actually, to me, if someone gives a new name to a new generated system install, they create a new distribution. This is precisely what CentOS does (well, there is the problem related to compilation order too on this case).

Edited 2013-03-28 22:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Not a distro
by YALoki on Fri 29th Mar 2013 02:58 in reply to "RE: Not a distro"
YALoki Member since:
2008-08-13

I used to be an IBM Linux instructor and that is where I learned that Linux is only a kernel around which many purveyors put their own choice of userland programs and applications.

So Linux packaged with other stuff makes a distribution.

I use OpenBSD which, like all the BSDs that I have ever seen together with other Unix and Unix-like OSes, comes with a comprehensive collection of typical Unix-derived tools.

All those pieces are compiled using the toolset that produced the matching kernel. Thus we get an Operating System. AIX, SunOS, Micronix, HP-Ux are others.

PC-BSD is an OS. Linuces with BSD bits hung on are still distros.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Not a distro
by terra on Fri 29th Mar 2013 04:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Not a distro"
terra Member since:
2012-11-01

PC-BSD is an OS. Linuces with BSD bits hung on are still distros.


However, PC-BSD is a FreeBSD "distro" which does not use Linux kernel at all.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Not a distro
by cb88 on Fri 29th Mar 2013 16:57 in reply to "RE[2]: Not a distro"
cb88 Member since:
2009-04-23

PC-BSD is a BSD guess what BSD stands for... you know Berkley System Distribution. so clearly it is a Distro ;)

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Not a distro
by judgen on Fri 29th Mar 2013 11:51 in reply to "RE: Not a distro"
judgen Member since:
2006-07-12

I never saw the benefit of LMDE compared to Neptune or aptosid. Would you plase care to enlighten me?

(neptune seems to have newer packages of almost all Qt software i use.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Not a distro
by acobar on Fri 29th Mar 2013 13:39 in reply to "RE[2]: Not a distro"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

I think it depends on whether you miss/want Mint artwork, extensions and Cinnamon/Nemo or not. Like with lots of Debian derivatives it is all about details, and most of the times they are really "subtle".

Anyway, my time trying a lot of distros is over now. I settled around openSUSE (my main option mostly) and LMDE for desktop. On servers I use the usual suspects, CentOS and Debian. For NAS it is OpenMediaVault or FreeNAS. And for a media center is XMBC + Debian.

I really like the fact that with Debian there are lots of stable applications pre-packaged and ready to use but I like also the up-to-date nature of openSUSE for development and yast to easy configuration.

Reply Parent Score: 2