Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 12:10 UTC
Windows The Verge confirms an earlier story by Mary Jo Foley. "Microsoft is preparing to revive the traditional Start button it killed with Windows 8. Sources familiar with Microsoft's plans have revealed to The Verge that Windows 8.1 will include the return of the Start button. We understand that the button will act as a method to simply access the Start Screen, and will not include the traditional Start Menu. The button is said to look near-identical to the existing Windows flag used in the Charm bar."
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RE[7]: Even if they do...
by Nelson on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 19:50 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Even if they do..."
Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

Yeah, semantic zoom discoverability is something I've struggled with in my own apps. My own analytics show that on non-Touch devices users don't even think to trigger semantic zoom.

I'm hoping that after Windows 8 has had some time in the market my customers get more accustomed to the UI paradigms introduced. The two biggest issues I have is Search Charm and Semantic Zoom (both on non-Touch, on Touch a majority of my people ~80% activate semantic zoom by day 2)

You can also use Ctrl+ and Ctrl- to activate and deactivate semantic zoom.

Its not perfect and I hope they work to make it better in Blue, but it is there if you need it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Even if they do...
by WereCatf on Mon 22nd Apr 2013 20:07 in reply to "RE[7]: Even if they do..."
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

I'm hoping that after Windows 8 has had some time in the market my customers get more accustomed to the UI paradigms introduced.


There was some discussion about the Metro UI-conventions a few weeks back and I said back then that the biggest issue with Metro is that there was simply not enough attention paid to discoverability and there was obviously too much of a rush to cram touch in there. There are, for example, some UI-elements that don't look interactive at all except when you hover a mouse over them -- how's a touch - user supposed to know it's interactive? Similarly, it requires a mouse - user to just randomly hover over things to find what is and what isn't interactive.

Underlining things, changing either the primary colour of the object in question or surrounding it with borders with enough contrast as wrt. to the object itself, things like that would immediately make things more accessible. Similarly, large movements over the entire screen that end up at small objects are generally clumsy UI-conventions and should be avoided; they're annoying even when using touch, but with a mouse it becomes even more frustrating.

My point with this rant is just that people shouldn't need to get accustomed to poor UI-design. Instead, the UI-design should be made to fit people.

Reply Parent Score: 2