Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th May 2013 22:43 UTC
Windows The Verge pointed me to a blog post by Leap Motion - which reveals how their Kinect-like motion control works with Windows 8. "From the second you plug in your Leap Motion Controller, you'll be able to browse the web and interact with your computer just by moving your hands and fingers in the air. With Leap Motion technology and Windows, you can do everything that's possible with multi-touch inputs - without actually touching anything. This also means that existing applications in Windows 7 and 8 will respond to your natural hand and finger movements. Soon, we'll show you how Leap Motion will work with Mac OS X." Quite cool.
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Not sure what problem this solves
by Coxy on Tue 21st May 2013 11:13 UTC
Coxy
Member since:
2006-07-01

Seems to be that you touch the air instead of the screen... you still have to hold our arm up in the air. Also form the videos it looks like you control a mouse pointer around the screen... I can imagine that that is difficult when trying to touch certain things, like trying to click a certain button amongst many other buttons

Reply Score: 4

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Seems to be that you touch the air instead of the screen... you still have to hold our arm up in the air. Also form the videos it looks like you control a mouse pointer around the screen... I can imagine that that is difficult when trying to touch certain things, like trying to click a certain button amongst many other buttons


I was thinking about this already back when Leap Motion was first introduced and IMHO that's exactly the wrong sort of interfacing to use this kind of tech. Some sort of actions where real 3-dimensionality is key would obviously be the right place for this, like e.g. with manipulating objects in all three dimensions, but also Leap Motion excels in situations where you need more than one point of interaction -- the mouse can only ever interact with a single point at any given time, but the Leap Motion can seemingly interact with full ten points simultaneously, so any action that either requires such or that has been designed to be more fluent and faster to do with multiple points of action are the kinds of situations that Leap Motion excels in.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Lennie Member since:
2007-09-22

My guess is: cheaper for large screens than touch screens.

I can see that now the hardware has become cheap enough, we can start to try out all kinds of new interfaces.

Google and Apple have voice control for their mobile devices. There is Google glass as well.

As someone mentioned below, some eyetracking might be useful to see if the person is actually looking at the screen.

We'll have to see how this develops. I think certain interfaces will fit certain use-cases very well. And we'll end up using that for that use-case. There is no one solution.

The technical people didn't think the iPad would be much of a succes either.

And the keyboard is still the fastest interface to get stuff done, but that doesn't mean people will use it for everything.

Reply Parent Score: 2