Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 20th Jun 2013 18:29 UTC, submitted by MOS6510
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless So, The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Microsoft was very close to take over Nokia, but that the talks eventually broke down, probably beyond repair - at least for now. The reasons the talks broke down illustrate something that I have repeatedly tried to make clear for a long time now: Nokia isn't doing well.
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RE[4]: Go ahead and short
by bentoo on Fri 21st Jun 2013 23:27 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Go ahead and short"
bentoo
Member since:
2012-09-21

"In my short time on OSnews I've come to learn that:
- Nokia is always 90 days from bankruptcy.


With their stock, how is this an extreme prediction?
"

Same thing was said about Apple in the 90s now look at their market valuation.

"- Every new Microsoft product and/or announcement is a sure sign of their impending doom.


I challenge you to find where anyone on staff said anything like that. It's an unquestionable fact that Windows 8 has not been a success. Writing about that doesn't mean the sky is falling.
"

I never said the staff wrote anything of the like. That said, 100M licenses in 6 months doesn't actually qualify as a failure either.

"- [Insert Year Here] will be the year of the Linux desktop. ;)


That's just bs. Not one of the staff at OSNews uses Linux on their desktop as a primary OS. I wonder if you can find where anyone said something like that that wasn't in jest. We're all fans and proponents of desktop Linux, but I don't think anyone thinks it's about the break and become the next #1 OS on a PC.
"

Obviously missing the joke. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Go ahead and short
by Vanders on Sat 22nd Jun 2013 10:21 in reply to "RE[4]: Go ahead and short"
Vanders Member since:
2005-07-06

"With their stock, how is this an extreme prediction?


Same thing was said about Apple in the 90s now look at their market valuation.
"

The turnaround of Apple Inc. required an extraordinary intervention by both Steve Jobs and Microsoft. Unless we see such a similar extraordinary intervention at Nokia, I don't see how the two are comparable.

As someone else said above me, Nokia's Q2-Q4 results will show us the real picture.

Reply Parent Score: 6