Linked by Howard Fosdick on Mon 24th Jun 2013 03:00 UTC
Linux I volunteer as tech support for a small organization. For years we relied on Ubuntu on our desktops, but the users didn't like it when Ubuntu switched to the Unity interface. This article tells about our search for a replacement and why we decided on Xfce running atop Linux Mint.
Thread beginning with comment 565453
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[5]: I'm in the minority but
by lucas_maximus on Mon 24th Jun 2013 10:21 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: I'm in the minority but"
lucas_maximus
Member since:
2009-08-18

I've haven't had to install a driver with Windows unless I was swapping in a new graphics card.

Windows pretty much just grabs hold of the appropriate driver off the net now in seconds.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: I'm in the minority but
by kwan_e on Mon 24th Jun 2013 10:27 in reply to "RE[5]: I'm in the minority but"
kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

I've haven't had to install a driver with Windows unless I was swapping in a new graphics card.

Windows pretty much just grabs hold of the appropriate driver off the net now in seconds.


Unless that required driver is an ethernet driver, which is amazingly what I had to do when I reinstalled Windows 7 on this current laptop.

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[7]: I'm in the minority but
by phoenix on Mon 24th Jun 2013 18:16 in reply to "RE[6]: I'm in the minority but"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

And, if it's an nVidia networking chipset, odds are that Windows Update will install a broken update. ;) nForce chipsets at work can't be updated to the latest nVidia nForce chipset available in Windows Update for this reason.

Broken drivers on updates are not limited to Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 4

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

http://www.osnews.com/permalink?565695

Sorry but I think this as an exception to the rule.

Reply Parent Score: 2

darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

I've haven't had to install a driver with Windows unless I was swapping in a new graphics card.

Windows pretty much just grabs hold of the appropriate driver off the net now in seconds.

Yeah, but that's just a little bit difficult if your networking driver doesn't come with it. I'm not disagreeing that Windows will usually pull down the correct drivers (though I've seen it misidentify the correct driver on a few rare occasions) but sometimes installing wi-fi drivers is still necessary. It's kind of hard to grab a driver off the net if you can't get connected to it. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: I'm in the minority but
by Morgan on Mon 24th Jun 2013 11:25 in reply to "RE[5]: I'm in the minority but"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

That's been my experience too, in fact Windows 7 even downloaded the graphics card driver when I started using a GeForce card. I still went to Nvidia's site for the more current and complete driver as some games complained about the Microsoft provided one though.

The interesting bit happened when I decided that the Intel Sandy Bridge GPU built in to my machine was good enough for the simple games that I play, and I gave my GeForce card to a friend in dire need for his 3D modeling courses at school. My machine has built in VGA and DisplayPort outputs, and my LCD monitor has VGA and DVI inputs. In Windows, I got native resolution using VGA, but in any OS that uses Xorg I could only get 640x480, if anything. After days of tinkering to no avail I gave up and decided to pick up a DisplayPort-to-DVI adapter. That fixed the issue immediately, and even improved the picture quality on Windows (all OSes now saw my LCD as a "built-in" monitor and defaulted to its native 1600x1200 res).

All of that tinkering and research should not have been necessary. Intel is the most "open" of the GPU manufacturers when it comes to alternative OSes, and I would think that any GNU/Linux based OS would instantly support it. Supposedly a fix for this obscure issue is coming, but as most people don't use VGA connectors these days I don't see it happening in the long run. Sandy Bridge is "old" tech and the trend in the open source world nowadays is beating Microsoft and Apple to the finish line, not supporting old 2011 era tech like mine.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[7]: I'm in the minority but
by MOS6510 on Mon 24th Jun 2013 11:47 in reply to "RE[6]: I'm in the minority but"
MOS6510 Member since:
2011-05-12

For some strange reason Windows Update (Windows XP) offers a GeForce driver, even when an official Nvidia is installed.

Let Windows do its thing and you'll end up with a 640x480 screen boosting 16 colors.

The only way to fix it is by installing the Nvidia driver.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[6]: I'm in the minority but
by gilboa on Mon 24th Jun 2013 13:47 in reply to "RE[5]: I'm in the minority but"
gilboa Member since:
2005-07-06

I've haven't had to install a driver with Windows unless I was swapping in a new graphics card.

Windows pretty much just grabs hold of the appropriate driver off the net now in seconds.


When trying to install Windows 7 on a number of brand new Asus laptops (different models, all using Atheros GbE NIC) we had to manually install the drivers.

Granted, building the alx driver under Linux is more complicated than double-clicking on setup.exe under Windows (at least to a non-veteran user), but Windows is far from perfect non-the-less.

Oh, even though the alx driver under Linux is still a beta driver (required out-of-tree drivers) it seems to perform better at long range compared to the Windows 7 (and 8) driver. Go figure.

- Gilboa

Reply Parent Score: 4

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

You would still be in the same situation with Linux if the kernel didn't have the network driver included.

Reply Parent Score: 4