Linked by Howard Fosdick on Mon 24th Jun 2013 03:00 UTC
Linux I volunteer as tech support for a small organization. For years we relied on Ubuntu on our desktops, but the users didn't like it when Ubuntu switched to the Unity interface. This article tells about our search for a replacement and why we decided on Xfce running atop Linux Mint.
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RE[4]: Partition lock-down
by l3v1 on Mon 24th Jun 2013 14:09 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Partition lock-down"
l3v1
Member since:
2005-07-06

FAT32 should NEVER be used to store "data". So if that's a Mint default, I'm very disappointed.


It most certainly is not. Whatever happened there, I can't easily believe it's LMint's fault. Been using it for 3 versions now at work in VBox, never seen anything like that happening.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Partition lock-down
by Laurence on Mon 24th Jun 2013 14:22 in reply to "RE[4]: Partition lock-down"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26


It most certainly is not. Whatever happened there, I can't easily believe it's LMint's fault. Been using it for 3 versions now at work in VBox, never seen anything like that happening.

That's what I suspected. And to be honest, I wouldn't have minded if he was honest about the fact that he was running non-standard config - as he could still have made a valid argument about usability. But to run a bespoke set up and then moan about how default Mint installs are broken is just deceptive.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Partition lock-down
by Kochise on Mon 24th Jun 2013 15:14 in reply to "RE[5]: Partition lock-down"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

Personal partition setup, I wanted the data partition to be fat32 to do disk image of the Linux system partition on the fat32.

If I had a problem I wanted to be able to recover my data partition with Windows. Ext drivers for Windows are not really reliable on writing, likewise Linux ntfs drivers are unreliable on writing.

Fat32 is very reliable, yet lacks of "security", journaling and 4+ GB file size. But for ARM cross development, you hardly need such file size.

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 2