Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 11th Jul 2013 09:12 UTC
Google "Google's Chromebook was dismissed as a bare-bones laptop with limited appeal when it debuted two years ago. Now it's defying skeptics and gaining share as the rest of the personal-computer market shrinks. Chromebooks have in just the past eight months snagged 20 percent to 25 percent of the U.S. market for laptops that cost less than $300, according to NPD Group Inc. The devices, which have a full keyboard and get regular software updates from Google, are the fastest-growing part of the PC industry based on price, NPD said."
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RE: Comment by smashIt
by chithanh on Thu 11th Jul 2013 10:53 UTC in reply to "Comment by smashIt"
chithanh
Member since:
2006-06-18

so chromebooks took 25% of the collapsed netbook-market?
doesn't sound that impressive to me

FTA: Chromebooks are also benefiting as the market for laptops that cost less than $300 is set to grow more than 10 percent in 2013, Baker said.

A segment that grows, at a time when the whole PC market contracts by 11% according to IDC[1] is not a bad place to operate in. This also means that the $300+ market collapses much faster.

[1] http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-57593170-92/lenovo-tops-hp-amid-we...

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Comment by smashIt
by Nelson on Thu 11th Jul 2013 11:16 in reply to "RE: Comment by smashIt"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Meanwhile they are a non factor in ultraportables thats due to explode in the next few years.

To put things in perspective, they control 3% of the total market. Thats up 2% YoY, which is still impressive but not as misleading as 25% of the netbook market.

The problem with competing on price is that once Microsoft lowers their prices, their value proposition evaporates. Look at Linux Netbooks for a refresher.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by smashIt
by chithanh on Thu 11th Jul 2013 12:52 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by smashIt"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

they control 3% of the total market. Thats up 2% YoY
The article claims 4-5% share, up from 1-2% in 2012.

The problem with competing on price is that once Microsoft lowers their prices, their value proposition evaporates.
Interestingly the Chromebooks do not only compete on price. Being almost maintenance-free is a big part of the equation.

Reply Parent Score: 8

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

What do you mean by "once microsoft lowers their prices"? You mean, once microsoft lowers their prices again? Or did microsoft raise there prices again after the netbook market died off and are now poised to lower it again?

I thought winRT was the Microsoft answer to Chrome, but they haven't been very successful with that strategy.

Edit:

By "successful" I mean in terms of getting OEM's to introduce new models. I would like to see a sales number comparison of WinRT devices vs Chome. It would be fairly interesting.

Edited 2013-07-11 14:05 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by smashIt
by jonathan2260 on Thu 11th Jul 2013 15:47 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by smashIt"
jonathan2260 Member since:
2013-01-18

The problem with competing on price is that once Microsoft lowers their prices, their value proposition evaporates. Look at Linux Netbooks for a refresher.


I think people you're forgetting that it's a different market compared to a little over 5 years, Microsoft's stranglehold on the OEMs has gotten very loose. When the netbooks with Linux arrived on the market the reason they used Linux was that Vista was such a resource hog. Windows XP wasn't being sold anymore until Microsoft reacted to the Netbook's popularity so they offered XP again for the netbooks and suddenly most netbooks sold in North America was Windows only.

Today, Windows is able to run on the hardware the chromebook uses yet these devices are shipping with Chrome OS.

We also see that OEMs are proposing laptops that dual boot Windows 8 and Android, something we would not have seen 10 years ago. I'm thinking of BEOS that was supposed to be shipped in dual boot on some Toshiba laptops until Microsoft objected.

Of course, Microsoft recently became a hardware manufacturer when they started to sell Surface tablets putting them in competition with their partners. This was probably a major wake up call for OEMs to diversify away from Microsoft which is why they are committing to the ChromeOS and Android. Just look at the way they stabbed their partners in the MP3 player markey when they offered the Zune. The OEMs need only to see that to realize that their partner could pull a fast one on them at any time.

Microsoft could give copies of Windows 8 to the OEMs, they're not going to stop the ChromeOS. If these devices sell well, the companies making them are not going to be stopped by Microsoft this time.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by smashIt
by smashIt on Thu 11th Jul 2013 11:56 in reply to "RE: Comment by smashIt"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

A segment that grows, at a time when the whole PC market contracts by 11% according to IDC[1] is not a bad place to operate in. This also means that the $300+ market collapses much faster.


where does it say that the <300$ markt is growing?

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Comment by smashIt
by Nelson on Thu 11th Jul 2013 12:02 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by smashIt"
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Its dumb. ChromeOS barely even registers on any kind of web usage statistics. This is perhaps strong sequential growth which is good and may indicate a trend, but its by no means taking the PC world by storm.

Even Surface shipments likely outnumber Chromebooks. Thats somehow a colossal failure while this is a roaring success.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Comment by smashIt
by chithanh on Thu 11th Jul 2013 12:54 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by smashIt"
chithanh Member since:
2006-06-18

where does it say that the <300$ markt is growing?
I quoted the Bloomberg article for you already. Let me do it again, this time in bold:

"Chromebooks are also benefiting as the market for laptops that cost less than $300 is set to grow more than 10 percent in 2013, Baker said. "

Reply Parent Score: 3