Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 18th Jul 2013 16:58 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless "The worst thing about Android phones isn't the crapware, though. It's the 'skins' - the modifications that phone companies make to Android's most basic features, including the dialing app, contacts, email, the calendar, the notification system, and the layout of the home screen. If you get the Play edition of these phones, you'll see Google's version of each of these apps, and you'll come away impressed by Google's tasteful, restrained, utilitarian design sense. But if, like most people, you get your phone for $199 from a carrier, you'll find everything in it is a frightful mess." Android's biggest problem (lack of updates is part of this). I got my Oppo Find 5 yesterday, and after only a few hours with the official, skinned firmware, I ran crying to the officially supported CyanogenMod 10.1 (Android 4.2.2). Stock (CM is mostly stock) is such a beautiful and elegant operating system - OEM skins are like screaming kids eating popcicles in front of you on a line to a theme park ride. Whenever someone hands me a stock Samsung or HTC, I die a little inside. Those guys simply have zero clue about software.
Thread beginning with comment 567375
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

Same here, I've been using a prepaid Samsung SGH-T404G for around 5 years now, never seen the need for a smartphone.


Let me guess, you never used a good one.

My camera does a far better job of being a camera


Yes, but do you have it with you literally everywhere you go? Many of my good pictures are taken at times when I would never think to take my camera.

my GPS does a far better job of being a GPS


In what way? My phone is just as accurate as a GPS, is much easier to load maps (automatic), and there are specialized apps for everything navigation (backcountry, geocaching, public transit, car, bicycle, walking). No standalone GPS is nearly that versatile.

my netbook does a far better job of doing everything else.


Well aside from being much less portable, taking much longer to boot, having worse battery life, not having any specialized apps for various functions, etc etc etc.

Edited 2013-07-18 20:34 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

I've used several iphones and a few nexus phones, not impressed.

I keep a Canon S3-IS with a collapsible mini tripod in the car. Videos and photos at the same time.

My GPS does all of that.

SSD, cell network USB chip installed inside of the netbook.

Small enough that it fit's in the netbook and car charger fit in the glovebox, glovebox has a lighter/power socket in it that only runs if the car is on.

Keyboard that is usable, extended life battery

Real programs since 90% of those cellphone apps are just web front ends Firefox does all of what they do, only better. And yeah, I eat local, but I have already looked up or have already been to every restaurant in the area. When it comes to going on trips, I look these things up in advance.

Having all of these things means I'm actually able to interact with real people instead of having my face buried in a damn phone everywhere I go.

So yeah, I see no reason to get a smartphone.

Edited 2013-07-18 22:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

I'm actually able to interact with real people


Those smell and are generally very unpleasant. I rather interact with electronics.

Reply Parent Score: 6

leos Member since:
2005-09-21

I've used several iphones and a few nexus phones, not impressed.

I keep a Canon S3-IS with a collapsible mini tripod in the car. Videos and photos at the same time.


Right, in other words you don't always have it on you.

My GPS does all of that.


I guarantee you it does not. I also guarantee you I can do everything much faster on the smartphone. Furthermore I guarantee you you don't have the GPS with you most of the time.

SSD, cell network USB chip installed inside of the netbook.


None of that refutes what I said.

Real programs since 90% of those cellphone apps are just web front ends Firefox does all of what they do, only better. And yeah, I eat local, but I have already looked up or have already been to every restaurant in the area. When it comes to going on trips, I look these things up in advance.


In other words, you miss out on the convenience. Of course a smartphone is not a necessity. Neither is a computer or any other device. But it's incredibly convenient.

Having all of these things means I'm actually able to interact with real people instead of having my face buried in a damn phone everywhere I go.


I guess you have poor impulse control if you think having a smart phone means using it 24/7

Edited 2013-07-19 01:47 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

levi Member since:
2006-09-07

Problem with smartphones is that there is a hidden competition - who's the smartest: user, device, manufacturer, operator or maybe NSA ?

So ... having camera that just takes photos and can't upload them somewhere behind your back, phone that is just phone and you can switch it off whenever you don't need it , gps receiver that shows your location to yourself counts for something; won't you agree ?

There are many arguments for both approaches but I think it's choice of the individual and not general rule.

Reply Parent Score: 1

spinnekopje Member since:
2008-11-29

Some thoughts:
A dedicated device does it's job (a lot) better than your smartphone.
I can use multiple functions at the same time or let someone else use a device while I use another one.
When one device fails, I only need to replace that one, which is a lot cheaper than your smartphone. Most have a lifespan of 5 to 10 years for me.

Things that are important to me:
phone: last as long as possible on a charge (now 1.5 months)
camera: make very good quality pictures in bad lighting conditions without flash
gps: usable on the mtb, a couple of days on a set of batteries when used a lot on a trip.. no problem when it falls on stones/concrete..
netbook: I never carry a computer with me as I really don't need one. I might buy a (small) tablet in the future, but I can't see enough use for it now.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Just to throw in another perspective...

I've used smartphones almost exclusively since the Treo 650 was released. It is still my favorite of all the smartphones I've owned and used, and that list includes:

Palm Treo 650 (favorite by far)
Palm Treo 700w
Palm Tungsten W
Original iPhone
more Blackberries than I can count
more Symbian Nokias than I can count
Nokia N900 (second favorite)
Motorola Cliq
HTC MyTouch 3G
Motorola Admiral
HTC Arrive (WP7, third favorite)
Blackberry Style (really liked it)
Samsung Nexus S
iPhone 4S (current phone)

I do enjoy having a stable, fast, feature packed phone, and while it's everything I seem to need in a convergence device (excellent phone, excellent camera, decent portable computer, decent media player, passable GPS) I find myself just so bored with it! Nowadays my phone is mainly used for (gasp) phone calls and texts, and the occasional picture or internet search. I could accomplish all of that with a basic phone, or if I were to dump Sprint and go back to T-Mobile I could pick up a Nokia 808 Pureview or Lumia and be all set (I really like the newest Symbian OS and I'm dying to try out WP8).

Then again, I have enough "toys" to tinker with, including a Raspberry Pi; to constantly tinker with my phone risks leaving me without a primary communication device. If I were a jobless, friendless bum that wouldn't be a problem but I have a life and two jobs, and both require me to keep a working phone.

So yeah, I can see the case for a non-smartphone in the hands of a smart user. To each their own.

Edited 2013-07-19 22:55 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

pgeorgi Member since:
2010-02-18

"my netbook...

... taking much longer to boot ...
"

Minor nit, but the boot times of Android and iOS (no idea about WP8) are ridiculous (usually longer than a current Windows, Ubuntu or Fedora boot).
It just doesn't matter because they're rarely booted from power-off - except if you're doing OS hacking (where this got painful for me).

Wakeup from stand-by is quite comparable between phones and netbooks - near instantaneous.

So the difference is in the use pattern.

Reply Parent Score: 3