Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 30th Jul 2013 23:08 UTC
Google "In the net neutrality vision of the world, broadband providers simply deliver packets as they are paid to do. When it was just a set of online services, Google happened to fall on the side of citizens and used to advocate against broadband companies controlling the pipes. Now that it’s an ISP itself, Google is becoming a net neutrality hypocrite." This is why trusting companies - any company - is simply a bad idea. Companies don't care about you, and those that say they do are liars.
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WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

Things aren't really being blown out of proportion. Google, themselves, have been lobbying for net-neutrality, they've been trying to pose themselves as the champion for end-user rights, they've been appealing to the geek audiences and they've very literally touted these kinds of measures as something inherently sinister...and then they go a full 180 when they themselves become an ISP. That's the whole and full crux here -- they're fucking hypocrites.

Reply Parent Score: 9

silviucc Member since:
2009-12-05

A whole 180?! They just don't want people doing what the douche in the article I linked to did.

Are they throttling content providers? No. Are they restricting VoIP usage? No. If you want to run a business over a cheapo' residential line they are just sending the message that's not acceptable.

Until I see them abusing policy and making people unhappy, excuse me for not lashing out at them over "what could happen".

Reply Parent Score: 1

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

If you want to run a business over a cheapo' residential line they are just sending the message that's not acceptable.


Then they should formulate their ToS like that. As it stands they're talking about servers of any kind -- including those personal ones. They may not do anything about personal servers, but they're not actually saying that they won't -- they're leaving the door right open.

We have an ISP here in Finland -- Sonera, that is -- that has exactly the same kind of clause and they've blocked all the most-common ports off completely, including (but not limited to) 22, 80 and 443 and they start to throttle all kinds of traffic if they notice the traffic not originating from some big-name service or website. I could definitely see Google going for the same thing eventually once they've established themselves properly as an ISP.

Edited 2013-07-31 10:35 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2