Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 7th Dec 2013 00:55 UTC
Microsoft

"It's pretty much a brick," says Pawn Stars' Rick Harrison as he rejects a Samsung Chromebook brought in by an actor playing a customer. Microsoft really doesn't want you buying this thing.

But why? Just how big of a threat are Chromebooks, Google's oft-ridiculed web-only laptops, to Microsoft's core business?

I'm puzzled too. It doesn't seem like Chromebooks are that big of a threat - why create terrible advertisements that only provide Google with free publicity?

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RE: Microsoft are just scared
by sb56637 on Sat 7th Dec 2013 13:47 UTC in reply to "Microsoft are just scared"
sb56637
Member since:
2006-05-11

Microsoft are just scared in general. Microsoft spent years building a super defensive, and for a long time very effective, defensive business strategy designed to protect Window's position on the desktop and Office's role at work. [...] Then in a shockingly short time all that defensive work was rendered almost irrelevant


Hmmm, interesting point. But do you really think that Microsoft's dominance on the traditional desktop and school and business use is actually in jeopardy? I'm not arguing, I'm just genuinely not sure. I would be the first to rejoice if the desktop/business computing market became more diversified, but I don't see Windows / Office really fading in the near future.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I don't think either is going anywhere anytime soon. What we're seeing at Microsoft is an interesting thing though, Microsoft's service orientation inevitably will make them more platform agnostic.

Xbox Music/Video launched on multiple platforms
Skype on multiple platforms
Office on multiple platforms
.NET Framework licensing restrictions removed for Mono in many libraries
Outlook on multiple platforms

Microsoft's entire Azure stack including the SDK are cross platform. Hell, there's a node.js VS plugin. By Microsoft.

Hell hasn't frozen over, Microsoft is going head first into services and its something to take note of because they are a very tenacious competitor.

Also the tunnel vision that caused them to miss the mobile boat isn't guaranteed to be there come the next disruption. They're already well positioned in the living room and in hybrids.

What happens once the money train dries up in mobile phones like it did for PCs? Who will have the most diversified business still standing?

Reply Parent Score: 4

zima Member since:
2005-07-06

They're already well positioned in the living room and in hybrids.

"Hybrids"?

Reply Parent Score: 2

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

but I don't see Windows / Office really fading in the near future.


I'm sure someone said the same about WordPerfect and Lotus 1-2-3 once.

Reply Parent Score: 8

iarann Member since:
2006-05-14

I'm sure someone said the same about WordPerfect and Lotus 1-2-3 once.


I'm sure Microsoft keeps that in mind, but it's worth pointing out that neither of those systems had anywhere close to the level of market penetration that the Office ecosystem does right now.

Reply Parent Score: 4

moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

"but I don't see Windows / Office really fading in the near future.


I'm sure someone said the same about WordPerfect and Lotus 1-2-3 once.
"

And Turbo Pascal, DBase, CLIPPER, Netware, VAX, ...

Reply Parent Score: 3

TechGeek Member since:
2006-01-14

"Microsoft are just scared in general. Microsoft spent years building a super defensive, and for a long time very effective, defensive business strategy designed to protect Window's position on the desktop and Office's role at work. [...] Then in a shockingly short time all that defensive work was rendered almost irrelevant


Hmmm, interesting point. But do you really think that Microsoft's dominance on the traditional desktop and school and business use is actually in jeopardy? I'm not arguing, I'm just genuinely not sure. I would be the first to rejoice if the desktop/business computing market became more diversified, but I don't see Windows / Office really fading in the near future.
"

I didnt think much about it either until recently, when I saw pushes for schools to start putting Raspberry Pi's in their classrooms. The education system is broken in many places and they are looking for things like Linux and new teaching technologies as a way of bolstering their offerings.

Reply Parent Score: 4