Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Jan 2014 11:16 UTC, submitted by andymc
OSNews, Generic OSes

We report regularly about Visopsys - one of the few hobby operating systems that survived where virtually all the others (SkyOS, Syllable, etc.) died out. They've got a new website, which seems like a nice occasion to give it some attention again.

The bulk of Visopsys is a fully multitasking, 100% protected mode, virtual-memory, massively-monolithic-style kernel. Added to this is a bare-bones C library and a minimal suite of applications - together comprising a small but reasonably functional operating system which can operate natively in either graphical or text modes. Though it's been in continuous development for a number of years, realistically the target audience remains limited to operating system enthusiasts, students, and assorted other sensation seekers.

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RE[3]: Comment by charlieg
by Vanders on Mon 20th Jan 2014 13:54 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by charlieg"
Vanders
Member since:
2005-07-06

IMHO, these guys are losing their life while they can become gods in an other world and another community.

Syllable was a hobby; hardly "losing their life". If anything the stuff I did in Syllable has been a great help to me professionally, and I'm still very proud of the code I wrote.

Reply Parent Score: 10

RE[4]: Comment by charlieg
by Alfman on Mon 20th Jan 2014 14:21 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by charlieg"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Vanders,

Syllable was a hobby; hardly "losing their life". If anything the stuff I did in Syllable has been a great help to me professionally, and I'm still very proud of the code I wrote.


Don't take it personally, everything posted on here is bound to get criticized by someone.

It's really nobody else's business how we challenge ourselves. Over a decade ago I also had my own little OS too, and it ended as I moved onto other things, but it fulfilled my personal objectives of learning how to do it. If anything, I feel like I've "lost" more of my life at work than spending time doing the hobbies I enjoy. If it were possible I would have liked to get that time back and spend more time doing projects of my choosing since it's my life. I suspect the majority of us who work on personally fulfilling projects feel the exact same way.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Comment by charlieg
by acobar on Mon 20th Jan 2014 14:23 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by charlieg"
acobar Member since:
2005-11-15

hardly "losing their life"


While I agree that the knowledge acquired on such projects can not be equaled to "losing their life" and many times prove to give new insights to coders about OS inner machinery, it is also a fact of life that the choices we made affect what we can achieve. Perhaps, it would be more useful to get acquainted to other subjects but who is going to be sure which one would be that on a field that changes so fast? The amount of inner knowledge we have to "throw away" on computing is overwhelming but we have no option but deal with it, somehow.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Comment by charlieg
by RobG on Wed 22nd Jan 2014 14:19 in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by charlieg"
RobG Member since:
2012-10-17

"a field that changes so fast".

In hardware terms, yes. Software, however, is one of the most reactionary disciplines that exists. To be successful, anything new must function exactly the same as the previous generation. Innovation does not happen that way.

Don't just take my word for it. Alan Kay and Rob Pike have expressed much the same opinion.

(Rob Pike on Systems: http://herpolhode.com/rob/utah2000.pdf)
(Alan Kay with DDJ: http://www.drdobbs.com/architecture-and-design/interview-with-alan-...)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Comment by charlieg
by zizban on Mon 20th Jan 2014 16:53 in reply to "RE[3]: Comment by charlieg"
zizban Member since:
2005-07-06

I worked in Syllable soon after it's fork from AtheOS. I did a little work on CD booting then was part of the Syllable logo team. I think we did a lot of good work and I am proud of my contribution.

When I see Syllable logo I still think to myself, "Man we did great work!"

Reply Parent Score: 6