Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 2nd Feb 2014 18:08 UTC
Games

I don't like writing negative articles that don't include a solution to the problem, but in this case, there is no solution. The state of in-app purchases has now reached a level where we have completely lost it. Not only has the gaming industry shot itself in the foot, hacked off their other foot, and lost both its arms ... but it's still engaging in a strategy that will only damage it further.

Why are these gaming studios so intent of killing themselves?

Because massive application stores created a race to the bottom - as well as a huge pile of crap to wade through. Ten to twenty years from now, we won't look back favourably upon the App Store or Google Play.

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Gamers are no longer the market
by Carrot007 on Sun 2nd Feb 2014 19:05 UTC
Carrot007
Member since:
2008-02-04

As I titled, "Gamers are no longer the market".

The market is profit. The market of people willing to put up with this sort of shit is greater than those wanting to pay for a good game. Therefore the popular market caters to these people.

These people are not gamers in the true sense, just people moving into a market that did not cater to them before.

Does not make me happy but there are still good games out there if you look for them. Just don't expect these neogamers to be there or even care what you actually want.

These "games" more fulfill the same needs that gambling does. Gaming has not become big these days, they are just calling something else gaming.

Please do not think I am being negative here, just realistic. I like games still these days when I can find them!

Edited 2014-02-02 19:17 UTC

Reply Score: 4

reduz Member since:
2006-02-25

This is actually more true that you imagine. I worked in several work for hire projects making games with IAPs.

The bizarre thing is that most people DO NOT invest money in such games, not even a little. Profit comes from few users that invest a lot, and there is not really anything in the middle. It's either whales or nobody.

Who are the whales exactly? No one knows, is it compulsive players or rich guys with plenty of money to spend? No one really knows.

Meanwhile, Steam is doing the same thing Nintendo did in the early 80s, which is to create a place with a quality bar for publishing, gamers love it and spend fortunes on content that is worth it.

Still, amazingly, investors and publishers ignore this proven formula of creating quality content, ignore the fact that distribution is cheaper than ever, and keep insisting on mobile and facebook with IAPs to a point it's ridiculous. At some point it's going to crash.

Edited 2014-02-02 19:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 9

CapEnt Member since:
2005-12-18

It must crash, for the love of god! Crash and burn!

Investors and greed publishers do not really knows the game market, they just want the money and that's it.

Just take a look at the games made by gameloft: a large chunk of it are just shameless ripoffs of popular PC/console games. Same for Zynga. This gives the whole Android game ecosystem a bad name, and keeps serious studios away.

The very first step to raise smartphone gaming to portable console quality (DS/PSP) is washing away these crappy companies.

Reply Parent Score: 5

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Who are the whales exactly? No one knows, is it compulsive players or rich guys with plenty of money to spend? No one really knows.


Probably the same nimrods who are ordering Viagra from some drug store they were introduced to via a random spam email. Or else sending money to somebody in Nigeria, to receive cash from a rich relative.

There's one born every minute ...

Reply Parent Score: 5

unclefester Member since:
2007-01-13

The bizarre thing is that most people DO NOT invest money in such games, not even a little. Profit comes from few users that invest a lot, and there is not really anything in the middle. It's either whales or nobody.


This general pattern is the same for most addictive behaviours including gambling, alcohol, drugs and collecting beanie babies. Most people spend very little money and a few spend a great deal.

Edited 2014-02-02 23:56 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

The market is profit. The market of people willing to put up with this sort of shit is greater than those wanting to pay for a good game. Therefore the popular market caters to these people.

These people are not gamers in the true sense, just people moving into a market that did not cater to them before.


Same thing is happening with apps. Ever since iOS was introduced, developers have figured out that there's a whole mass of tech tards out there ready and willing to use and spend money on apps, and you don't have to put a whole lot of work into making apps for these people. The result is that a lot of high-profile apps have been released that are very polished and slick, but have very little in the way of functionality. Even older apps have been re-released with a lot of their functionality ripped out, and a new coat of paint applied, with the big new feature being, 'share your activity with your friends!!!'

In other words, the industry has declared war on power users, just as it has done with core gamers. (It certainly does not like introverts either.) Of course, I don't really blame them... power users and core gamers are picky and expensive to develop for, while tech tards will use whatever you give them, as long as it's idiot-proof. It just sucks being told constantly that if you want xyz feature, 'you are in the minority', which basically means the minority doesn't matter anymore.

Edited 2014-02-02 21:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 7

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

I think this is a welcome move, the fierce reduction in complexity in both interaction design and feature set has been to the benefit of many.

Features need to be thoughtful, not plentiful. Make something as simple as it can be, but no simpler.

Take multitasking for example, the move to push services exposed a whole host of applications which simply did not NEED background support and where consequently just wasting resources.

Moving to a model where background amplifies functionality instead of defining it has led to much better designed apps and it has also led to platform agnostic services.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Once you use the term "gamer" you lose me. I won't touch anything associated with that term. I find it discriminatory, derogatory, demeaning and disturbing.

Endorsing its use and applying it to yourself sets yourself up for terrible treatment by companies.

Reply Parent Score: 2