Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 20th Mar 2014 23:15 UTC
3D News, GL, DirectX

DirectX 12 introduces the next version of Direct3D, the graphics API at the heart of DirectX. Direct3D is one of the most critical pieces of a game or game engine, and we've redesigned it to be faster and more efficient than ever before. Direct3D 12 enables richer scenes, more objects, and full utilization of modern GPU hardware. And it isn’t just for high-end gaming PCs either - Direct3D 12 works across all the Microsoft devices you care about. From phones and tablets, to laptops and desktops, and, of course, Xbox One, Direct3D 12 is the API you've been waiting for.

It's great that DirectX works across "phones and tablets, to laptops and desktops, and, of course, Xbox One", but an important adjective is missing here: Windows. With Microsoft playing little to no role in smartphone and tablets, and the desktop/laptop market being on hold, how much of a plus is DirectX on phones and tablets, really? Doesn't Windows Phone's and Windows 8 Metro's reliance on it only make it harder for game developers and houses to port their iOS and Android games over?

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RE: All hopes on OpenGL
by andrewclunn on Fri 21st Mar 2014 14:02 UTC in reply to "All hopes on OpenGL"
andrewclunn
Member since:
2012-11-05

There are a few things that Microsoft really does well, and should be given credit for. DirectX is one of them. Pushing forward the graphics API isn't something to scoff at. OpenGL plays catch up trying to copy what DirectX pioneers. 3D gaming isn't big on tablets partially because a tablet's touch interface doesn't really work for 3D controls, and graphics card vender specific graphics APIs are far worse than DirectX from any freedom standpoint.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL
by moondevil on Fri 21st Mar 2014 14:08 in reply to "RE: All hopes on OpenGL"
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

This is one thing may FOSS guys preaching OpenGL always miss.

- Not all OpenGL versions (mobile, web, desktop, embedded) are compatible

- You end up writing multiple code paths for supporting multiple vendors/targets

- Except for PS3 with ES 1.0/Cg, consoles do not use OpenGL

- C APIs for handling resources are a pain.

- OpenGL lacks standard way to load textures/fonts/contexts/shaders making each developer re-invent the wheel, or hunt for libraries.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: All hopes on OpenGL
by Kalessin on Fri 21st Mar 2014 19:31 in reply to "RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL"
Kalessin Member since:
2007-01-18

OpenGL is certainly not without its faults (e.g. the extension situation with it is a bit ridiculous IMHO), but at least it's intended to be cross-platform. DirectX is intended to be Windows-only. And it's very bad for the general software ecosystem when technologies are tied to a specific OS. That fosters lock-in rather than innovation and doesn't help consumers (or developers) at all.

Ideally, pretty much all software would be cross-platform within its domain (e.g. desktop, mobile, etc.). Reality doesn't always allow for that, but creating libraries that are intended to only work on one platform is outright counterproductive.

Now, Microsoft doesn't care about that, because they want a monopoly, but it's bad news for the rest of us (including folks who just use Windows) when a technology gets pushed which isn't cross-platform. It hurts consumers and makes it harder for developers to produce good, cross-platform software.

So, I'd much rather see Microsoft trying to improve their OpenGL implementation and helping to improve the OpenGL standard so that whatever problems OpenGL has can be fixed rather than continuing their own proprietary stuff.

No, they won't do it, because they're Microsoft, but it's certainly not good news for us that they're continuing to push DirectX rather than helping improve open standards.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: All hopes on OpenGL
by tylerdurden on Fri 21st Mar 2014 21:44 in reply to "RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL"
tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17


- Not all OpenGL versions (mobile, web, desktop, embedded) are compatible


Same goes for DirectX


- You end up writing multiple code paths for supporting multiple vendors/targets


That's indeed a major failing of OpenGL, but you have similar situations with DirectX when having to support the dot releases (which is usually how MS supports whatever ATI is doing).


- Except for PS3 with ES 1.0/Cg, consoles do not use OpenGL


Except for Xbox consoles do not use DirectX. ;-)

(PS4 and Wii U use some form of OpenGL in varying degrees of bastardization, but these Japanese companies have had traditionally horrendous development toolchains/systems compared to MS).



- C APIs for handling resources are a pain.


Which is why there are C++ wrappers...



- OpenGL lacks standard way to load textures/fonts/contexts/shaders making each developer re-invent the wheel, or hunt for libraries.



Again, that could be an issue or a feature. There are some toolkits that take the pain away, and honestly if you know what you're doing it's not that hard to find the correct devel environment for OpenGL.

It all depends on what the context/situation is. If one is targetting the desktop, it makes sense to marry your fate to Windows since they control the majority of it. Whereas on the mobile/tablet side of things OpenGL dominates to the point of making DirectX almost irrelevant in that space.

One size does not seem to fit all, so each has their pros and cons.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL
by WereCatf on Fri 21st Mar 2014 14:34 in reply to "RE: All hopes on OpenGL"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

OpenGL has nothing to do with touch-input. OpenGL only handles graphics output, it does not handle input devices at all.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: All hopes on OpenGL
by Kochise on Fri 21st Mar 2014 15:07 in reply to "RE[2]: All hopes on OpenGL"
Kochise Member since:
2006-03-03

That's SDL's task, or DirectInput ;)

Kochise

Reply Parent Score: 3