Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 12th Sep 2014 22:06 UTC, submitted by Orichalcum
Windows

Microsoft may have demonstrated its new Start menu earlier this year, but thanks to a recent "Windows 9" leak we're now seeing every single part of the company’s plans for bringing back this popular feature. German site WinFuture has posted a two-minute video that demonstrates how the Start menu works in the next major release of Windows. As you'd expect, it's very similar to what Microsoft demonstrated with traditional apps mixing with modern apps (and their Live Tiles) into a familiar Start menu.

It boggles my mind why Microsoft doesn't just remove Metro from the desktop altogether. Is there anyone who wants to run those comically large touch-optimised applications in windows on their desktop? Why not restrict Metro to where it belongs, i.e., mobile? Why all this extra work?

It just doesn't seem to make any sense.

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by Hiev on Fri 12th Sep 2014 22:33 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

Is there anyone who wants to run those comically large thouch-optimised applications in windows on their desktop?

What is wrong with windowed metro apps?

And I bet this start menu will be cloned by Linux Desktops, I guarantee it.

Edited 2014-09-12 22:48 UTC

Reply Score: 4

RE: ...
by Z_God on Fri 12th Sep 2014 23:46 in reply to "..."
Z_God Member since:
2006-06-11

Yeah, it actually looks nice to me. I have never used Windows 8 though, so maybe there's something I miss, but it seems like a neat way to quickly look up the temperature or other info like exchange rates.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: ...
by ssokolow on Sat 13th Sep 2014 00:24 in reply to "..."
ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

And I bet this start menu will be cloned by Linux Desktops, I guarantee it.


No contest. Linux desktops clone everything (inherent side-effect of an open-source platform that attracts people looking for "choice" who know how to program) and, if I were already experienced in writing KDE Plasma widgets, I could probably implement that in an afternoon by mashing together the existing application launcher and widget container codebases.

The only question is whether it'll be a narrowly-scoped "Look granny, it's what you're familiar with" clone or a broadly-useful "Look, we're flexible enough for you to clone the Windows 9 start menu if you want" clone.

Edited 2014-09-13 00:26 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: ...
by Lorin on Sat 13th Sep 2014 01:44 in reply to "..."
Lorin Member since:
2010-04-06

They did, Ubuntu and that Unity mess, most abandoned it for Mint or other distro

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[2]: ...
by moondevil on Sat 13th Sep 2014 05:24 in reply to "RE: ..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

Every GNU/Linux user I know, still uses Ubuntu.

Edited 2014-09-13 05:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: ...
by zima on Fri 19th Sep 2014 23:47 in reply to "RE: ..."
zima Member since:
2005-07-06

"Most" (two orders of magnitude more) are very much still using using Ubuntu: http://stats.wikimedia.org/archive/squid_reports/2014-08/SquidRepor...

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: ...
by testadura on Sat 13th Sep 2014 08:06 in reply to "..."
testadura Member since:
2006-04-14

The start menu?
Luckily GNOME 3 had abondoned this concept in favor of something superior.

But integrating desktop widgets into the start menu really makes relevant again ;) How is this different from the widget frameworks or Apple dashboard?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: ...
by grat on Mon 15th Sep 2014 17:44 in reply to "RE: ..."
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

Personally, I'd rather they just imported the Windows 7 start menu, and let me put the tiles (of my choosing) on the desktop to replace Ye Olde Gadgets.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: ...
by Carewolf on Sat 13th Sep 2014 08:59 in reply to "..."
Carewolf Member since:
2005-09-08

And I bet this start menu will be cloned by Linux Desktops, I guarantee it.

Well, the linux desktops did manage to copy the old start menu screen years before Microsoft "invented" it.

Edited 2014-09-13 09:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by Hiev on Sat 13th Sep 2014 16:16 in reply to "RE: ..."
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

Citation needed, I haven't found any evidence of your claim, this is the story of the start menu in Wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Start_menu

There is no mention that is a copy or is based in something else, actually, it mentions how the Linux desktops copied it.

Edited 2014-09-13 16:16 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: ...
by moondevil on Sat 13th Sep 2014 21:14 in reply to "RE: ..."
moondevil Member since:
2005-07-08

I wonder how old you are, as I clearly remember it was copied by GNU/Linux distros.

Back then most users were on xwt, the original fvwm, Open Look and a few other ones.

fvwm95 fork from fvwm even appeared before GNOME and KDE projects were born.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: ...
by silviucc on Sat 13th Sep 2014 09:36 in reply to "..."
silviucc Member since:
2009-12-05

We already have better "start" menus, you folks can keep it. But I do like how Windows 9 rips off the way GNOME 3 does virtual desktops.

Redmond, start your photocopiers!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: ...
by Z_God on Sun 14th Sep 2014 11:24 in reply to "..."
Z_God Member since:
2006-06-11

And I bet this start menu will be cloned by Linux Desktops, I guarantee it.

http://rootgamer.tweakblogs.net/blog/10812/verkracht-ubuntu-in-3-st...

Reply Parent Score: 2