Linked by jessesmith on Wed 5th Nov 2014 10:39 UTC
Linux Over the past year I've been reading a lot of opinions on the new init technology, systemd. Some people think systemd is wonderful, the bee's knees. Others claim that systemd is broken by design. Some see systemd as a unifying force, a way to unite the majority of the Linux distributions. Others see systemd as a growing blob that is slowly becoming an overly large portion of the operating system. One thing that has surprised me a little is just how much people care about systemd, whether their opinion of the technology is good or bad. People in favour faithfully (and sometimes falsely) make wonderful claims about what systemd is and what it can supposedly do. Opponents claim systemd will divide the Linux community and drive many technical users to other operating systems. There is a lot of hype and surprisingly few people presenting facts.
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woegjiub
Member since:
2008-11-25

There's choice, then there's 1000+ distros.

Most of them are just someone's custom theme on top of Ubuntu/Debian, too. Why should that be a distro, instead of just being a theme?

Why use something that is *almost* $BIG_DISTRO_Y instead of $BIG_DISTRO_Y itself?

If your distro doesn't really have anything to set it apart from all of the others, should it really exist, or is it just unnecessary time spent without any real reward or purpose?

Linux on servers only really uses the big distros, same for the destkop.
Unless you're actually doing something unique like nixOS, there is no benefit to not just keeping around an ansible/puppet config to build a custom image of the big distro your custom one would have been made from.


Linux was a hobby project, which is not duplication of effort - it's someone doing something for the purposes of learning.

If minix or HURD were suitable for Linus at the time, he would have gone with them by the way.

"If the GNU kernel had been ready last spring, I'd not have bothered to even start my project: the fact is that it wasn't and still isn't. Linux wins heavily on points of being available now."

http://lwn.net/Articles/395150/

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