Linked by David Adams on Tue 14th Jul 2015 23:21 UTC
Original OSNews Interviews From Linux Voice: "Perl 6 has been 15 years in the making, and is now due to be released at the end of this year. We speak to its creator to find out what’s going on."
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RE[6]: Why perl?
by Wondercool on Wed 15th Jul 2015 16:43 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Why perl?"
Wondercool
Member since:
2005-07-08

I do maintain code written by others but the problems we solve aren't in the league of extremely complicated algorithms or problems and as such most code is still readable, just not my taste.

But yeah in Perl this is a bigger problem than in other languages but if you program often in Perl I don't think it is a big issue at all. I am certainly not a proponent of using exotic language features unless it is required.

That said: I don't think libraries are a particular problem of Perl. Just compare with Java where you have Log4j, SL4J, Logback just to name a few logging frameworks. Nowadays knowing your library is half the work, but that applies to many languages.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Why perl?
by Alfman on Wed 15th Jul 2015 19:47 in reply to "RE[6]: Why perl?"
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Wondercool,


That said: I don't think libraries are a particular problem of Perl. Just compare with Java where you have Log4j, SL4J, Logback just to name a few logging frameworks. Nowadays knowing your library is half the work, but that applies to many languages.



Certainly this is true to an extent, but at least the standard Java libraries are designed under collaboration with the developers of the rest of the framework.

Perl modules are strewn together with no evidence of coordination at all. This wasn't so bad in the early days of programming when projects were self contained and the end result was all that mattered. But today's software is complex, requiring mashups of independent projects with many different subsystems working together. The absence of standard framework foundations can lead to unnecessary complexity and frustration when different pieces of the project use different abstraction libraries to represent the exact same data.

As you say, this problem isn't always unique to perl, but it is magnitudes worse. As cfqr pointed out above, some language designers explicitly aim to build a strong standardized foundation. Perl never had this goal, which is why it never achieved it.

IMHO perl is fine for small utilities and scripting, which is how I use it; I even prefer perl to bash any day! But I think the general consensus would be to avoid it for general large scale application development.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[8]: Why perl?
by Wondercool on Wed 15th Jul 2015 21:50 in reply to "RE[7]: Why perl?"
Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08

Sure Perl isn't a good fit for large scale application development at the moment. We don't use it as such (max is about 5000 lines, typically only a few 100 lines).

I find the libraries in CPAN in general of high quality and don't really miss that many of them weren't build in the open with lots of feedback from other people.

As you say, it is more for short and sweet scripts but with the impressive improvements in the last years in Perl 5 and now in 6 and some superb frameworks like Moose and new web frameworks like Dancer and Catalyst, I think Perl is on the up again, well at least I hope so, and maybe it will become a fine general purpose language

Reply Parent Score: 2

sergio Member since:
2005-07-06

IMHO perl is fine for small utilities and scripting, which is how I use it; I even prefer perl to bash any day! But I think the general consensus would be to avoid it for general large scale application development.


You have a VERY strong point here!!!

If you are an unix admin you cannot relay on Bash to create your script because Bash is only used by default in Linux (and Solaris 11). BSDs, HP-UX, AIX don't use Bash by default (much of them don't have Bash even installed!!)

Linux people think that the world ends with Linux and everything is Python... well, that's not true at all.

Perl is the only tool that allows you to write real multiplatform scripts, that's why almost every Unix admin in the world use it every day.

People who say "Perl is useless" have no idea of what they are talking about. It doesn't surprise me btw.

Reply Parent Score: 2