Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 19th Sep 2015 14:37 UTC
Internet & Networking

Let's talk ad-blocking.

With the arrival of iOS 9, ad-blocking is coming to mobile in a big way, and it's causing a lot of talk all over the web. It is highlighting the internal struggle some feel about the practice, but also the hypocrisy of some of its staunchest proponents. So far, it seems like the real 'bloodbath' isn't taking place where people thought it would be - namely, publishers - but among personalities.

Thread beginning with comment 618021
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: The elephant in the room
by Wondercool on Sat 19th Sep 2015 21:29 UTC in reply to "RE: The elephant in the room"
Wondercool
Member since:
2005-07-08

This is not really true, it is a fallacy that people need ad money to make websites. Just like that if music doesn't make any money, people will stop playing music or book writers writing books.

Before 1998 there was no advertising yet the content was of high level because people put websites up out of enthusiasm, dedication. Just like this website btw. Started mainly for the love of BEOS. I doubt Thom/David/Eugenia and others made/make any money but that is not its purpose.

The only thing then you had to worry about were the blink tags on geocities ;)

I know I am not holding a popular opinion but most tech sites are mostly iterating the same press releases (BGR, Engadget, Anand, Alphr, etc etc
If they don't and throw out some opinionated piece, while it often entertaining to read, you have to ask yourself, would you pay 50 euro per year for that and think for most people the answer is no.

When the ads stop working, we will lose some of those sites, but isn't that a blessing?

Give me back the internet without ads and if the site is really good, like for instance Wikipedia (what an oasis in the world of ads!) or Wayback machine, I am happy to transfer some money - and I have.

Reply Parent Score: 10

kwan_e Member since:
2007-02-18

This is not really true, it is a fallacy that people need ad money to make websites.


Good. Because that wasn't the argument.

Before 1998 there was no advertising yet the content was of high level because people put websites up out of enthusiasm, dedication.


I think that is a fallacy. Or at least an observational bias.

I doubt Thom/David/Eugenia and others made/make any money but that is not its purpose.


It's not about making a profit. It's about paying for the hosting. Or have you lived in a silver-platter world so long you forgot that simple things like websites have operational costs?

When the ads stop working, we will lose some of those sites, but isn't that a blessing?


No, because if you understood the points others have made, it's the small sites like THIS one that will be lost. The ones people make for quality content and not just for the ad revenue.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Wondercool Member since:
2005-07-08

Let me rephrase it. The point I was trying to make is that it's not sites like OSNews that will go under, it's sites like The Verge with paid staff that have to worry. The Verge, like Alphr, Engadget, BGR, etc, have full-time paid staff and are much more dependent than small sites on ads.

I don't know about you but I don't come here to read about the latest tech news, I follow at least 10 tech sites every day and generally they all publish the same story. Most of the time I have already seen the original article Thom is linking to. I come here for the opinions, comments on the tech news. For me, that's the interesting bit.

Thom's original opinion articles are much more visited and appreciated than a simple article about IOS 8 been released so I am not alone.

Anyway, back to your original postulate that my web experience won't exist if I don't accept ads, that is just not true. I argue that my web experience will improve:
a) No more commercial interference with my brain (how anyone can allow oneself to be brainwashed knowingly and accept it, is beyond me).
b) Less commercial me-too sites in the long run thinking about the fellow user rather than the sponsor.

Reply Parent Score: 4

CowMan Member since:
2006-09-26

The cost of web services has also dropped handsomely in that time, with a greater proportion of sites partially or completely deriving value from user uploaded media, discussions, etc.

Reply Parent Score: 2