Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 5th Nov 2015 00:06 UTC
Red Hat

The partnership we are announcing today with Red Hat extends our commitment to offer unmatched choice and flexibility in an enterprise-grade cloud experience across the hybrid cloud. With more than 80 percent of the Fortune 500 using Microsoft’s cloud, for us to team with the leader in enterprise Linux allows even more businesses to move to the cloud on their terms. By working with Red Hat, we will address common enterprise, ISV and developer needs for building, deploying and managing applications on Red Hat software across private and public clouds, including the following.

Only fourteen short years ago:

Linux is not in the public domain. Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches.

What a time to be alive.

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RE[6]: Makes sense
by maccouch on Fri 6th Nov 2015 12:37 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Makes sense"
maccouch
Member since:
2012-03-14

if you consider that bringing larger user and software vendors awareness (and actual software&users) to the linux ecosystem is nothing, then there's not much that can be done.

Pretty much every single piece of user-level software that has come to Linux on the last 5 years, has come to, and because of, Ubuntu. I think that's pretty much...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: Makes sense
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 6th Nov 2015 19:33 in reply to "RE[6]: Makes sense"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I'm not sure what software packages you are thinking of, or what a "user level application" is?

Could you be more specific? Are you talking about, like Steam, maybe? I don't think having steam on linux really helps me as much as having a better OS itself. In any case the linux port was just a stepping stone to the steam machine, which is not ubuntu based. The apps I need, are basically already there and their continued development is not being supported by canonical.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Makes sense
by allanregistos on Sat 7th Nov 2015 05:09 in reply to "RE[7]: Makes sense"
allanregistos Member since:
2011-02-10

I'm not sure what software packages you are thinking of, or what a "user level application" is?

Could you be more specific? Are you talking about, like Steam, maybe? I don't think having steam on linux really helps me as much as having a better OS itself. In any case the linux port was just a stepping stone to the steam machine, which is not ubuntu based. The apps I need, are basically already there and their continued development is not being supported by canonical.


I think the trend now is most commercial software vendors will release first for Ubuntu then the rest will follow if there is a demand. As a matter of fact, I will never install other Linux distro but Ubuntu desktop all alone for business computers. I have CentOS installed, but then I change my new install of servers to Ubuntu because applications I need are now supported under Ubuntu.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Makes sense
by abraxas on Sat 7th Nov 2015 12:23 in reply to "RE[6]: Makes sense"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

if you consider that bringing larger user and software vendors awareness (and actual software&users) to the linux ecosystem is nothing, then there's not much that can be done.

Pretty much every single piece of user-level software that has come to Linux on the last 5 years, has come to, and because of, Ubuntu. I think that's pretty much...


Huh? What software are you referring to? All the software projects that Ubuntu starts eventually die and are replaced by something better. Unity, Mir, Upstart are all projects that are dying or dead and have better alternatives.

Reply Parent Score: 2