Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 24th May 2017 20:02 UTC
Windows

Over the past 3 months, we have largely completed the rollout of Git/GVFS to the Windows team at Microsoft.

As a refresher, the Windows code base is approximately 3.5M files and, when checked in to a Git repo, results in a repo of about 300GB. Further, the Windows team is about 4,000 engineers and the engineering system produces 1,760 daily "lab builds" across 440 branches in addition to thousands of pull request validation builds. All 3 of the dimensions (file count, repo size and activity), independently, provide daunting scaling challenges and taken together they make it unbelievably challenging to create a great experience. Before the move to Git, in Source Depot, it was spread across 40+ depots and we had a tool to manage operations that spanned them.

As of my writing 3 months ago, we had all the code in one Git repo, a few hundred engineers using it and a small fraction (<10%) of the daily build load. Since then, we have rolled out in waves across the engineering team.

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RE[3]: Too many cooks...
by avgalen on Mon 29th May 2017 09:43 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Too many cooks..."
avgalen
Member since:
2010-09-23

Just as I said, you were just trolling and cannot specify which 5% of developers can stay.

"The code" is clearly not 300 GB of active code. Compiling 300 GB of active code into the 4 GB that is a current Windows install.wim would be an amazing feat! That 300 GB is all the history and also includes things like testfiles which can be far larger than actual code. To give you an idea, I probably will not write more than 1 MB of actual code in my whole life, just like most writers will not write more than 1 MB of actual book in their whole life....but the PDF with our company logo is probably close to that 1 MB already.

Your car comparison is just silly and even false. Just like we do different things with computers compared to 30 years ago (4K full screen video on the internet vs postage stamp local videos and "HTML/CSS/JavaScript vs RTF"), the same is unfortunately true for cars so their weights have gone up and fuel efficiency has gone down: http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/05/business/average-us-car-is-tippin... and that wasn't so much related to technical features but very much linked to oil/gas prices and comfort!

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Too many cooks...
by Alfman on Mon 29th May 2017 17:55 in reply to "RE[3]: Too many cooks..."
Alfman Member since:
2011-01-28

Just as I said, you were just trolling and cannot specify which 5% of developers can stay.

"The code" is clearly not 300 GB of active code. Compiling 300 GB of active code into the 4 GB that is a current Windows install.wim would be an amazing feat! That 300 GB is all the history and also includes things like testfiles which can be far larger than actual code.


"Trolling" is too harsh. unclefester is probably right about the level of bloat, and you're probably also right that most of that code is likely not used at all and is merely a historical archive. We could debate whether having mountains of legacy code base serves any practical purpose today, but it doesn't really matter that much.

What bugs me more than this is the ever increasing size of the bitcoin block chain, haha. 120GB and counting, and bitcoin isn't even that popular, and is outgrowing the bandwidth capacity of P2P users, just imagine if everyone used it!


To give you an idea, I probably will not write more than 1 MB of actual code in my whole life, just like most writers will not write more than 1 MB of actual book in their whole life....but the PDF with our company logo is probably close to that 1 MB already.



I'd say 1MB isn't that much. For example my last C++ project representing less than a year of coding time is at 701k. This is just source code with no media and excluding 3rd party libraries.

Reply Parent Score: 2