Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 14th Sep 2017 22:11 UTC
Windows

Today, we are thrilled to unveil the next step in our journey for Windows Server graphical management experiences. In less than two weeks at Microsoft Ignite, we will launch the Technical Preview release of Project "Honolulu", a flexible, locally-deployed, browser-based management platform and tools.

Project "Honolulu" is the culmination of significant customer feedback, which has directly shaped product direction and investments. With support for both hybrid and traditional disconnected server environments, Project "Honolulu" provides a quick and easy solution for common IT admin tasks with a lightweight deployment.

I've never managed any servers, so it's difficult for me to gauge how useful of popular tools like these are. What is the usual way people manage their servers?

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Comment by FlyingJester
by FlyingJester on Thu 14th Sep 2017 22:46 UTC
FlyingJester
Member since:
2016-05-11

I spent several years working in IT at the National Park Service, which is an all-Windows affair. We did occasionally use AD, but normally we used a (paid) replacement called Hyena since AD was very annoying to use for some very common operations.

Reply Score: 4

RE: Comment by FlyingJester
by Rokas on Fri 15th Sep 2017 06:35 in reply to "Comment by FlyingJester"
Rokas Member since:
2017-09-12

I spent several years working in IT at the National Park Service, which is an all-Windows affair. We did occasionally use AD, but normally we used a (paid) replacement called Hyena since AD was very annoying to use for some very common operations.

Hmm, interesting. Could you elaborate in more detail what were you using AD for? And how? And what problems you had with it?

Reply Parent Score: 1

FlyingJester Member since:
2016-05-11

We were primarily using it for managing users and machines. Mostly changing and setting passwords, adding and removing users and machines, and changing OUs of users. We used it occasionally for other things (I think some WSUS and DC configuration, but I was less involved in that).

We attempted to automate some these operations with PowerShell (which was new at the time), but the poor error reporting and lack of documentation meant we couldn't get it to work.

Hyena made these tasks much faster, enough so that we bought licenses for it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Comment by FlyingJester
by grat on Fri 15th Sep 2017 18:59 in reply to "Comment by FlyingJester"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

When I was managing several hundred workstations and a couple dozen servers, AD was more than up to the task-- Granted, that was with the (then) newly released Group Policy Preferences-- tools that most people never figured out, so they bought third party packages.

We were deploying everything from drive maps, firewall rules, printers and software applications via GPO's, and it worked fine.

We even had remote assistance working correctly on Windows 7 (with UAC enabled).

Orchestration was largely done with powershell.

Now I'm primarily a linux admin, so I edit puppet manifests and YAML, and wait for the magic to happen, and I use mcollective for orchestration.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by FlyingJester
by Rokas on Sat 16th Sep 2017 07:43 in reply to "RE: Comment by FlyingJester"
Rokas Member since:
2017-09-12

I used to work as Active Directory specialist in a company with thousands of servers and hundreds of thousands of workstations across the globe with different AD sites being connected via all kinds of connections, including high-latency satellite links. The Active Directory architecture and technologies are mostly up to the task and handle everything no problem, but unfortunately their management tools are very rudimentary and just plain inadequate in situations like these.

Reply Parent Score: 2