Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Apr 2018 21:35 UTC
Games

While it's true Steam Machines aren't exactly flying off the shelves, our reasons for striving towards a competitive and open gaming platform haven't significantly changed. We're still working hard on making Linux operating systems a great place for gaming and applications. We think it will ultimately result in a better experience for developers and customers alike, including those not on Steam.

Through the Steam Machine initiative, we've learned quite a bit about the state of the Linux ecosystem for real-world game developers out there. We've taken a lot of feedback and have been heads-down on addressing the shortcomings we observed. We think an important part of that effort is our ongoing investment in making Vulkan a competitive and well-supported graphics API, as well as making sure it has first-class support on Linux platforms.

Valve has done a lot for Linux gaming, and it's good to hear they pledge to continue doing so.

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RE[9]: Some history
by moltonel on Sat 7th Apr 2018 23:14 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: Some history"
moltonel
Member since:
2006-02-24

[q]We are talking about the lack of AAA titles on Linux, not filtered lists you create on Steam, or games you find entertaining. It's beyond laughable you think 1/3 of the most popular games are available to Linux.

Take a list of the top 20 most popular game franchises, or even the top 100 best selling games, tally which are available for Linux, and be ready for disappointment.[\q]

That's precisely what I did: The list I took is the top 100 best-selling games on Steam, not my own curated list of favorites. And it has 33% Linux-supporting games. If you think my methodology is wrong (it's clearly not perfect), you'll need to provide a better one. Or is your mind tricking you into ignoring facts that contradict your worldview ? That would be disheartening but common, which I guess fits the "beyond laughable" description.


There doesn't seem to be much point in giving a detailed response to the rest, but one last tidbit: you're conflating Linux gaming's market share (an objectively tiny one indeed) with the suitability of the platform (a more subjective value, I find it pretty good despite its various issues including available titles). Finding it pretty bad would be reasonable too, but I find your have an irrationally negative view of it.

Reply Parent Score: -1

RE[10]: Some history
by ilovebeer on Sun 8th Apr 2018 00:11 in reply to "RE[9]: Some history"
ilovebeer Member since:
2011-08-08

That's precisely what I did: The list I took is the top 100 best-selling games on Steam, not my own curated list of favorites. And it has 33% Linux-supporting games. If you think my methodology is wrong (it's clearly not perfect), you'll need to provide a better one. Or is your mind tricking you into ignoring facts that contradict your worldview ? That would be disheartening but common, which I guess fits the "beyond laughable" description.

No, that's not precisely what you did. The best-selling games *on Steam* do NOT represent the best-selling games as there are tons of games and huge franchises that are not available on Steam. Your insistence on using Steam lists means your argument is so bad it needs fact-filtering in an attempt to appear otherwise. I doubt anyone is fooled though, yourself included.

There doesn't seem to be much point in giving a detailed response to the rest, but one last tidbit: you're conflating Linux gaming's market share (an objectively tiny one indeed) with the suitability of the platform (a more subjective value, I find it pretty good despite its various issues including available titles). Finding it pretty bad would be reasonable too, but I find your have an irrationally negative view of it.

My view is the view shared by the vast majority of gamers, and developers for that matter, so you must think we all have an "irrationally negative view". It's hard to take comments like that seriously being as absurd as they are.

I'm not surprised you're not up for the challenge when I said, "By all means, do your best to make a good argument *against* going with platforms that 1) are vastly popular, 2) have a vastly larger library of games available, and 3) in the case of consoles, are cheaper and require NO maintenance." It's a fools challenge in that only a fool would actually think there *is* a good argument against it.

Lastly, no, I'm not conflating Linux desktop market share and Linux suitability as a gaming plaform. They are obviously two different things, but obviously both factors in the big picture. Linux desktop market share is tiny, therefore the potential customer pool is tiny, therefore the profit potential is tiny. The Linux desktop itself along with various underlying components and subsystems aren't in or don't stay in a state suitable for a stable serious gaming platform, therefore you have increased cost in both development and support. Making a Pros & Cons table it quickly becomes easy to see why Linux gaming is in the state it's in. And with that I'll remind you that being less horrible than it was 10 years ago doesn't mean it's good today. But hey, you know, this is finally the year of the Linux desktop so it may as well finally be the year of Linux gaming while we're at it, right?

Reply Parent Score: 2