Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 6th Jan 2006 22:22 UTC, submitted by letsrock
Linux "Linux is not Windows, and although there are some similarities, you must realize that there may be a few 'new ways of doing things' to learn before you can be comfortable in Linux. Linux is an open-source clone of UNIX, a secure operating system that predates DOS and Windows and is designed for multiple users. The items in the following list generally apply to any UNIX-based *nix system, such as Linux and the various BSD's. For the purposes of this article, assume that it's all Linux."
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Errors
by ma_d on Fri 6th Jan 2006 23:28 UTC
ma_d
Member since:
2005-06-29

"Linux has come a long way in the few short years of its existence. It is less than half the age of Microsoft Windows"
This is somewhat close for Linux alone, if you consider Windows 1.0 to be in any way the same as Windows XP (but I'd argue that in that respect Unix is a natural precursor to Linux and should be called the same thing, especially since Unix software usually runs on Linux ;) ). However, if you consider the rest of your software:
KDE is half the age of Windows, I believe it was first released in 1996 or so? Gnome was started around 1997 IIRC.
The GNU project started around the same time as Windows, depending on what you consider its start (release of Emacs, when RMS announced it, when the AI lab became desolate; I'd go for the second option).

So, he's really pretty crazily wrong about that statement. Besides, modern Windows started in 1988 when NT was started.


The article is generally awfully short. I do like his diagram about the filesystems. That's nice. His section on permissions is unwarranted and useless. His section on CLI is too short to do more than confuse.

I did get one thing out of it. I never knew xkill could be activated with ctl+alt+escape!

Reply Score: 2

RE: Errors
by fizzled on Fri 6th Jan 2006 23:35 in reply to "Errors"
fizzled Member since:
2006-01-06

"I did get one thing out of it. I never knew xkill could be activated with ctl+alt+escape!"

Neither did I... but it's not working for me. I'm using xfce on top of Ubuntu 5.10-- maybe xfce doesn't support it an gnome & kde do.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Errors
by chemical_scum on Sat 7th Jan 2006 00:35 in reply to "RE: Errors"
chemical_scum Member since:
2005-11-02

"I did get one thing out of it. I never knew xkill could be activated with ctl+alt+escape!"

Neither did I... but it's not working for me. I'm using xfce on top of Ubuntu 5.10-- maybe xfce doesn't support it an gnome & kde do.


Same here in GNOME on my old Mandrake 10.1 system

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Errors
by Sphinx on Sat 7th Jan 2006 01:27 in reply to "RE: Errors"
Sphinx Member since:
2005-07-09

Please, you're in X, map any key to any event or any command your heart so desires. The commands may vary a bit from wm to wm but it's built right into every one of them.

I would hate to have someone think Ubuntu desktop may not be as polished as it's hype suggests.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Errors
by ma_d on Sat 7th Jan 2006 06:36 in reply to "RE: Errors"
ma_d Member since:
2005-06-29

Just bind it to the program `xkill`. I'm using KDE and it probably has it bound by default.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Errors
by rayiner on Fri 6th Jan 2006 23:38 in reply to "Errors"
rayiner Member since:
2005-07-06

The age argument is a little bit simplistic, but I think its important to consider what the author was going for. The fact that Linux started in 1991 and NT in 1988 doesn't really mean much. How much code is left in modern Linux or modern Windows from those early versions? How much code and design work was carried over into NT from previoius versions?

The more salient thing to look at is not years, but man-years. How many man years of effort have gone into Windows XP, including the amount reused from pre-NT versions of Windows? How many have gone into Linux + KDE/GNOME, including the amount reused from previous UNIXes, and things like X Windows?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Errors
by ma_d on Sat 7th Jan 2006 06:42 in reply to "RE: Errors"
ma_d Member since:
2005-06-29

I know what you're saying and I hate to contradict you but. I really think more time has gone into a comparable Linux system as Windows. Let's just say:
Linux, binutils, emacs, kde, gcc, xorg.
Compared to.
Windows XP, Visual Studio.

I think more time has gone into linux and kde than Windows XP...

The reason I say this is two fold:
1.) There are faaar more features in linux+kde+xorg than in Windows XP
2.) The bazaar development method is not a monicker of efficiency. You've got thousands of people making small modifications. To do that you have to waste time getting to know the project. In a more cathedral environment you only get used to the code once.

Of course, 2 has its own advantages that come with that. For one, more people complaining about things that are hard to understand is going to get them changed; which will aid later maintainability.
And another, I think people program a little differently when they think someone smarter than a manager is reading their code. It's pride.

Also, I really think the Windows UI was rushed and has been left largely unfixed because it's probably a nightmare. Now, by UI, I don't mean GDI, I don't mean Windows Forms. I mean explorer. I mean the single program that manages your whole desktop and hasn't had a new feature since its inception.

Reply Parent Score: 2