Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 18th Jan 2006 19:00 UTC
FreeBSD "For software that's been around since the late '70s, before any of today's more popular operating systems, open source BSDs (in their current avatars) don't get their due share of hard disks. FreeBSD, one of the first BSD flavors to emerge from the 386BSD project, is a Unix-like free operating system based originally on the BSD branch of 386BSD and later 4.4BSD-Lite. This makes BSDs more like traditional Unixes than Linux. Late last year FreeBSD unleashed release 6.0, with better support for 64-bit and wireless hardware. Here's our review."
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RE[2]: Documentation
by dikatlon on Thu 19th Jan 2006 00:07 UTC in reply to "RE: Documentation"
dikatlon
Member since:
2005-07-08

Anyway, Gnu/Linux is the most userfriendly secure desktop operatingsystem out there.
But for geeks it maybe doesn't turn out to be good.

Btw, I am n00b when it comes to FreeBSD. I have not much experience. I know there is something called linux binary support. I do code quite much with the Qt4 toolkit and are somewhat dependent on that. Is it enjoyable to code/use it with FreeBSD?

One more thing. You seem not to like gnu/linux or the linux kernel at all - do you argue that the whole gnu/linux, linux community is living a lie? I mean do you think it is a joke? Don't you respect Linus Torvalds and other big players who has done things around gnu/linux? Hope you don't get mad ;)

I don't want to personally jump on you - I am so curious. Cause you seem to be so HARD on this question.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Documentation
by Tom K on Thu 19th Jan 2006 02:41 in reply to "RE[2]: Documentation"
Tom K Member since:
2005-07-06

Most user-friendly secure desktop operating system out there? I think not. Ever play with OS X?

Anyway, if you're a Linux guy switching to FreeBSD, you won't have too hard a time as long as you've spent time in the terminal before. If you're a clickety-click Ubuntu/Fedora/Mandrake/etc. guy, you will hate FreeBSD, so don't even bother. There are differences, like where some files are kept, how configuration of the system is accomplished, how compilation of kernels is done, but once you read the handbook, it all makes sense, and you will find yourself preferring the BSD way over the Linux way. Where Linux feels like a mish-mash of methods with no thought about organization, FreeBSD is organized through-and-through.

Linux binary support in FreeBSD is basically a stripped-down set of Redhat libraries/configuration files, and a kernel component, that allow you to run most Linux binaries on your FreeBSD system.

And no, I do not like Linux very much. I could write an essay about why I don't, but it can be more or less summarized with "lacks direction, lacks organization, lacks a concrete set of specifications as to where what should go". What I hate more is the fanboys who don't see anything past Linux. They claim it's the greatest thing on Earth, all while ignoring the downfalls. I hate these people.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Documentation
by abraxas on Thu 19th Jan 2006 04:55 in reply to "RE[3]: Documentation"
abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

And no, I do not like Linux very much. I could write an essay about why I don't, but it can be more or less summarized with "lacks direction, lacks organization, lacks a concrete set of specifications as to where what should go". What I hate more is the fanboys who don't see anything past Linux. They claim it's the greatest thing on Earth, all while ignoring the downfalls. I hate these people.

Every operating system has its positive qualities and negative qualities. Some people value organization over choice, some don't. Linux is much more modular in the sense that there are many more options in the kernel and even in a lot of gnu userspace programs. With so many choices and so many new technologies inserted into the kernel at such a rapid pace things can get a bit more disorganized. The benefit is that you can switch out filesystems, schedulers, sound systems, security models, etc. at will. There are also a myriad of different distributions that have their own way of solving problems in different and unique ways. There are a lot of us out there who value these choices. Some of us are not content with "traditional" Unix and these additional options are what draws us to Linux.

You are the same as any Linux zeolot, the only difference being your opinion but in the end flamebait is flamebait, no matter what you're advocating for.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Documentation
by Mathman on Thu 19th Jan 2006 05:24 in reply to "RE[3]: Documentation"
Mathman Member since:
2005-07-08

Well, you're exactly right. Linux completely and utterly lacks direction. I mean, on the one hand you have firewall distros along the lines of IPCop. On the other you have clustering distros along the lines of Rocks. You have Windows clones like Xandros. You have embedded distros like Monte Vista. There are security minded distros like EnGarde. Not to mention live cds like Knoppix. Where's the direction??? Linux as a whole is just going absolutely nowhere. Heck, my high performance Linux cluster is just a nightmare to set up and maintain. My Linux firewall never does what I set it up to do, not for years and years and years. Now that I think about it, my Linux firewall doesn't even have an IP address. And my desktop systems? Compared to FreeBSD? Forget about it.

So screw Linux. BSD is where it's at. When it comes to BSDs, you're exactly right. No software at all in any BSD is anything other than what the BSD developers created all by their very lonesome. Not some mish mash of applications from all over the world as is the case with Linux. BSDs aren't so stupid as to borrow things from other BSDs like Linux distros do. And don't even get me started on BSD ports. I mean, it's literally thousands of applications that BSD developers created all by theirselves.

And once again you hit the nail on the head when it comes to ease of use. Those clickety-click tools like Yast and the Mandriva Control Center are just buggy pieces of trash that just get in the way. There's just no way you can learn how to use them. But with BSD it's just so simple. Once you spend hours and hours learning things the hard way and doing away with basic common sense computer concepts like abstraction, you're set.

So right. I hate those Linux people too. We should all do the world a favor and kill the next Linux zealot we encounter. Linux is just pure trash after all.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Documentation
by dikatlon on Thu 19th Jan 2006 07:57 in reply to "RE[3]: Documentation"
dikatlon Member since:
2005-07-08

Well I know about Mac OS X - but I was talking about cheap software. Gnu/Linux is free.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Documentation
by dikatlon on Thu 19th Jan 2006 08:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Documentation"
dikatlon Member since:
2005-07-08

Anyway...
I've been using Gnu/Linux cause, it just happened to stand on the library book shelf for 6 years ago.
So maybe my argument is rather, "I am stuck here, why move?".

The thing I cannot understand, is that you don't seem to respect the work the Gnu/Linux community has done?

I mean a Gnu/Linux operatingsystem today, is the most powerful *FREE* desktop system.
You got HAL, D-BUS and other good core components that makes your work smoothier.
And there are something kalled Freedesktop standards.
Anyway, isn't the gnu core tools, binutils etc -
arent it good software?

And sometimes you seem like you are a Windows fanboy, then I sometimes think you where the one who took FreeBSD to the Microsoft Server Halls in the 90'ies.

I don't know who I am going to trust now?

There are bashing people on all areas(Linux Community, Micrososft, *BSD).
But your comments are rather taking my mind to use FreeBSD.

Go ahead, write that article.
Show the world that linux users is living a lie - if it is what you mean.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: Documentation
by happycamper on Thu 19th Jan 2006 14:56 in reply to "RE[3]: Documentation"
happycamper Member since:
2006-01-01

"lacks direction, lacks organization, lacks a concrete set of specifications as to where what should go"


Yup, I agree, that is why linux will never win in the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 1