Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 22nd Jan 2006 23:03 UTC
BSD and Darwin derivatives There are a lot of options in the Free UNIX market at the moment. Everyone's favorite buzzword is Linux, and Sun is in the process of releasing Solaris under a Free Software license. One family, however, receives less attention than it is due. Berkley Software Distribution (BSD) has grown into almost a complete replacement for UNIX, with numerous enhancements. David Chisnall explains why the BSD family has found its way into a large number of systems and what these systems can do for you.
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BSD Rocks
by ZaNkY on Sun 22nd Jan 2006 23:14 UTC
ZaNkY
Member since:
2005-10-18

BSD rocks (as my subject says ;) )


My favorite distro is OpenBSD. It's the way ALL OSs should be written, with security in mind. PLUS, it doesn't loose ease of use or potential eye candy as a trade off. You can still install and window/desktop manager and is no easier/difficult to operate than any other BSD (as far as I know).

Over all, BSD is awesome ;)

(note: I only read parts of the article ATM, more in a couple mins)

--ZaNkY

Reply Score: 5

RE: BSD Rocks
by fretinator on Mon 23rd Jan 2006 15:21 in reply to "BSD Rocks"
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

My favorite distro is OpenBSD. It's the way ALL OSs should be written, with security in mind. PLUS, it doesn't loose ease of use or potential eye candy as a trade off. You can still install and window/desktop manager and is no easier/difficult to operate than any other BSD (as far as I know).

I always had the impression that OpenBSD was super hard to install and only for the faint of heart. Now, though, having experienced all 3 main BSD's, I find that OpenBSD is fairly easy to setup and administer. It's NetBSD that I find downright daunting. I can setup NetBSD, but then things get pretty wierd for me. No home directory? No adduser command? I guess it is Unix the old school way. I'm not a newbie, but I found it pretty confusing. I have a nice wireless OpenBSD laptop to go with my Debian and Mandriva laptops.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: BSD Rocks
by neocephas on Mon 23rd Jan 2006 15:39 in reply to "RE: BSD Rocks"
neocephas Member since:
2006-01-11

Hmm. I have no experience with OpenBSD, but I do have lots of experience with NetBSD and some with FreeBSD. I don't find either of them terribly difficult to configure or maintain. If anything, both are a lot simpler to setup and maintain than a Debian or RedHat system, at least from the command line.

As for the no home directory thing, the root user is in /root I believe and you can add users with useradd -g users -m -s /bin/ksh foouser, just like you can on most Linux distros. If you specify the -m flag the program will create the /home/foouser directory and copy over any skeleton files. I guess NetBSD doesn't create a /home folder during installation because there are no users that can login (besides root) by default.

Btw, I have a nice wireless NetBSD laptop to go with my Ubuntu desktop. To each his own ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 3