Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 23rd Jan 2006 19:20 UTC
Legal "DRM is a lie. When an agenda driven DRM infection peddler gets on a soapbox and blathers about how it is necessary to protect the BMW payments of a producer who leeches off the talented, rest assured, they are lying to you. DRM has absolutely nothing to do with protecting content, it is about protecting the wallets of major corporations. The funny thing is they aren't protecting it from you, they are protecting it from each other."
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RE: This article is a useless rant
by JeffS on Tue 24th Jan 2006 00:46 UTC in reply to "This article is a useless rant"
JeffS
Member since:
2005-07-12

"DRM is about raising the cost of piracy for the average person to the point that they would more likely conform with the copyright."

This statement assumes that most average people steal content, or don't respect copyright.

When you look at the fact that most average people don't steal, and do respect copyright, then your whole premise is blown completely out of the water.

People just want to buy their music/movies, and be able to play it on their various devices and PCs, without the hassle of DRM.

The article is 100% right in that DRM is about companies trying to obtain virtual monopolies, and/or screw eash other, and/or edge each other out of the big content consuming pie.

DRM is a joke, and is completely useless, and only screws honest, paying consumers. Plain and simple.

Reply Parent Score: 2

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

This statement assumes that most average people steal content, or don't respect copyright.

Don't they though? I don't know very many people (actually, only a few) who have a passing knowledge of how to pirate and don't do it. For example, I was riding with a friend in her car, and she was listening to the latest Nickelback CD. (A band I don't really care for, but that's beside the point.) She just casually mentioned that her sister bought the CD and 'made a copy' for her. And this is otherwise a pretty honest person. Most people who consider themselves honest won't hesitate to burn a copy of something that their friends own.

As for preventing casual piracy, this same person attempted to let her stepdad 'borrow' her Windows XP install CD, but the product activation barked at them when they tried to install. Of course, this is easily worked around, but you gotta have the knowledge. And most people who have that knowledge will do it. (BTW: Personally, I don't pirate stuff.)

Edited 2006-01-24 02:18

Reply Parent Score: 1

JeffS Member since:
2005-07-12

"She just casually mentioned that her sister bought the CD and 'made a copy' for her."

" this same person attempted to let her stepdad 'borrow' her Windows XP install CD"

What you're talking about here is what I consider, and many, many, many people consider, to be "fair use".

If I buy something, I should be able to share that something with a friend or family member. Just imagine if you bought a book, read it, then loaned it to your brother or someone else. You have a moral right to do so. Also, I should be able to loan my skill saw to my neighbor. There are many such examples.

The copyright on Windows and some CDs forbids such "fair use", and it is, quite frankly, immoral to forbid such fair use.

Now what is fair for content producers to forbid is unauthorized redistribution for profit. That's what does actual damage to someone's business-depending, revenue-producing intellectual property.

Piracy, or casual sharing among family and friends, does not do damage to a content producer's business or livlihood. Nor does file sharing on the internet, as most studies/surveys have shown that the biggest file dowloaders/sharers also tend to be the biggest purchasers, and they even increase their purchasing of content after downloading heavily.

DRM being used by large companies is only their stategy to gain a leg up on their competion and extract more cash from consumers. DRM provides no benefits and only causes hassles and/or limitations on consumers. DRM is a disaster.

Reply Parent Score: 1