posted by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Mar 2015 21:51 UTC
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The Steam controller is a big part of what makes a Steam Machine a Steam Machine; we were told that running SteamOS and being packaged with the controller were two of the main things that need to be included to use that branding. The controller itself has gone through a number of revisions, but we were able to use what Valve is calling the final version during GDC.

We've been using pretty much the same controller setup for a while now, so I'm glad Valve is trying to see if things can be improved. I have no idea if this will be it - a hands-on is required - but I'm open to try.

In addition to the final Steam controller and the announcement that Steam Machines will hit the shelves later this year (sure, Valve, sure), the company also unveiled a new streaming box for gaming.

Valve will release a new product called Steam Link later this year that will "extend your Steam experience to any room in the house," according to an announcement from the company. Steam Link will work with PCs - including Valve's Steam Machines and Windows, Mac and Linux computers - to stream content from Steam to the device, as long as they're on the same home network.

Steam Link will support 1080p resolution at 60 Hz "with low latency," Valve says. The device will be available this November and will retail for $49.99.

I'm definitely buying the Steam Link, as it seems like a great way to play PC games on my living room TV without having to hook a full PC up to it. Of course, a lot will depend on the latency, and I'm sure using a wired network is preferable (which I do).

The last and final Valve announcement: the Source 2 engine. It's not yet available, but it will be free for developers. The Source engine powers a number of classic titles - Half-Life 2, Left 4 Dead 1 and 2, Counter-Strike: Source, and so on - and it's hard not to assume that a release of the Source 2 engine also means Hal...

No.


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