Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 27th Jul 2005 19:07 UTC
Windows While Vista Beta 1 is stealing most of the headlines this week, Microsoft also is delivering simultaneously on wednesday to a group of private testers the first beta of its Longhorn Server product.
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Wow!! How exciting ...... [end sarcasm]
by JeffS on Wed 27th Jul 2005 21:05 UTC
JeffS
Member since:
2005-07-12

Check out this column by Steven J Vaughn-Nichols:

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1841067,00.asp

... it's hilarious. It gleefully points out Longhorn's - err - Vista's complete lack of innovation, and behind-the-times, under the bellcurve "new features", and huge resource consumption.

In short, Windows Longhorn will be complete, useless crap. And this after over 5 years of development, and untold billions spent on R&D.

All of Longhorn's "new features" are already implemented in both OSX and Linux, today, right now.

Longhorn will be super resource hungry, requiring as much as a Gig of memory (according to some reports), or a minium of 512 Megs. And it will require at least a 3GHz cpu.

Longhorn's DRM is a joke. Why buy songs off the internet if you can't load them on your iPod, or other MP3 player, or burn them to CD, or back them up? The DRM in Longhorn will only screw customers, and protect MS partners.

It amazes me, with MS's billions spent on R&D, and over 20,000 programmers on staff, that they can't actually come up with anything interesting or exciting or innovative or benefiting the consumer. MS relies completely on their desktop and Office monopoly, and having their stranglehold on hardware and software vendors.

Please people. Do yourselves a favor. Try something else - OSX, Linux, BSD, whatever.

Longhorn is a joke.
MS is a joke (except as a tenacious monopolist).

Reply Score: 3

Member since:

:) Sometimes I think that they are just stupid. Things like DRM, Trusted Computing etc. can be succesful in USA, but citizens of majority of EU member states will resist, the same with India and Canada and others. I'm happy about that because Longhorn/Vista will be IMHO a great failure for Microsoft. I don't "wish they die", I just want them to change their policy. In free world, market (consumers) decide, and they will decide _not_ to buy these operating systems.

Reply Parent Score: 0

Dvorak
by Network23 on Thu 28th Jul 2005 08:08 in reply to "Wow!! How exciting ...... [end sarcasm]"
Network23 Member since:
2005-07-11

Dvorak agrees. For the first time I agree with Dvorak.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,1840479,00.asp

"Vista? As in "Hasta la Vista, baby?" That name might be appropriate as a symbolic goodbye since it might be the end of the line for Microsoft's dominance in the OS business."

"The new OS is getting zero buzz. Zero. now the name Vista, along with the new Microsoft Vista logo, has made it worse. Could anything be less exciting?"

"THE FUTURE OF DESKTOP COMPUTING: Apple. Vista will open the door to what I believe will be a radical change in the computing landscape. The trends are clear. Once the new Mac OS appears next year it will gravitate toward the existing x86 community much more rapidly than anticipated..."

"Right now, and as much as x86 users do not want to admit it, the Mac OS is already better than Windows in its modern look and feel as well as its functionality. I see too many smart people with Mac laptops nowadays."

"...it is always possible that Apple doesn't understand the power play position it's in and might actually believe that it's better off somehow keeping its OS in a small niche rather than the big market. If the world changed tomorrow to 85 percent Mac "OS x86" its laptop sales alone would triple overnight. Apple didn't put together what many consider the finest in-house industrial design teams in the world to fool around with piddly sales and more redesigns of the iPod."

"That said, how much more of Steve Jobs can we handle? Do we really want to hear him say "I told you so?" If it gets some excitement back into desktop computing, yes, we do. I think we can take it."

Reply Parent Score: 2