Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 10th Dec 2006 18:33 UTC, submitted by alcibiades
Microsoft "Microsoft Office isn't among the apps that will run natively on Intel-based Macs - and it won't be until the latter half of 2007, according to media reports. But when it does ship, Office will apparently be missing a feature so vital to cross-platform compatibility that I believe it will be the beginning of the end for the Mac version of the productivity suite."
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RE[2]: MS protect Windows
by Ronald Vos on Sun 10th Dec 2006 22:37 UTC in reply to "RE: MS protect Windows"
Ronald Vos
Member since:
2005-07-06

It's off-topic, but:

"It's sad though that they won't have a Universal version ready initially. Then again, Adobe just released Acrobat Reader as two executables, one for each platform, for each language. Some companies just can't do things right."

Maybe Adobe is using something other than Xcode for Acrobat, like for Photoshop (since Xcode hasn't been the best IDE available to them in the past).
Or maybe they just don't care for the logistics of distributing needlessly big binaries en masse.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Adobe
by s_groening on Mon 11th Dec 2006 08:19 in reply to "RE[2]: MS protect Windows"
s_groening Member since:
2005-12-13

Maybe Adobe is using something other than Xcode for Acrobat, like for Photoshop (since Xcode hasn't been the best IDE available to them in the past).

Well, to judge from this blog entry by Mark Niemann Ross, although 14 months old, it seems like Xcode is the tool of choice:

Q. How does this affect Adobe’s product development plans?

A. Adobe expects to support both PowerPC® and Intel microprocessors with future versions of its Mac OS applications, including Adobe Creative Suite, Photoshop®, Illustrator®, InDesign®, GoLive®, Acrobat® Professional, InCopy®, and other Adobe applications. To support this expanded development effort, Adobe plans to transition its Apple development process from Metrowerks CodeWarrior to Apple’s Xcode, a high-performance UNIX-based development environment that can support a universal binary wrapper on two binaries— one for systems based on Intel processors and one for systems based on PowerPC processors.


And concerning the splitting up of binaries into Intel and Power PC specific versions, I do believe there might be some performance issues to look at.

I stripped my iTunes 7.02 of the Intel bits for running on an older mac at home, and it cut down the memory usage by 40% and at the same time lowering cpu usage considerably. I know this is not a present day machine, however, I do believe the impact might get even bigger for applications like CS 3 in the future...

Edited 2006-12-11 08:21

Reply Parent Score: 1