Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 20th Feb 2007 09:59 UTC
Window Managers What is wrong with KDE 3.x? What is wrong with GNOME 2.8+? These seem to be the two questions arising from the recent revival of Linus vs. GNOME spat. We all know the history; Linus called the GNOME guys 'interface nazis' and advised Linux users to use KDE, which resulted in the longest comment thread on OSNews ever. That kind of fizzled out, only to be brought to light again by Linus submitting a few patches to make GNOME behave more like he wants it to behave.
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RE[2]: I say good for Linus
by falemagn on Tue 20th Feb 2007 14:28 UTC in reply to "RE: I say good for Linus"
falemagn
Member since:
2005-07-06

"The windows "registry" is binary, nonstandard and not documented. The GNOME configuration files are standard XML files which are documented within the GNOME project or the respective applications. Furthermore, you may consult the source code."

"Standard XML file" is almost an oxymoron, as XML defines the syntax, certainly not the semantics of the tags used in those files. The fact the "registry" is binary whilst GNOME XML configuration files are textual means nothing positive towards GNOME XML configuration files, as to properly edit either of those you need a purposedly-built editor. And even if you could use your text editor of choice to edit GNOME configuration files, it'd be still way more cumbersome than using regedit on windows.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: I say good for Linus
by Doc Pain on Tue 20th Feb 2007 14:46 in reply to "RE[2]: I say good for Linus"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

""Standard XML file" is almost an oxymoron, as XML defines the syntax, certainly not the semantics of the tags used in those files. "

That's correct. You can get the information needed for interpretation from the GNOME documentation project or the respective GNOME application's source code.

Documentation is the Alpha and Omega.

Try man gnp, man gftp or man gimp vs. man koffice, man kuser or man k3b. :-)

"The fact the "registry" is binary whilst GNOME XML configuration files are textual means nothing positive towards GNOME XML configuration files, as to properly edit either of those you need a purposedly-built editor."

You can still edit the XML files by hand as long as you know what you do.

For every task the right tool. GNOME provides tools to handle the configuration files, so does KDE for its ~/.kde/ hierarchy.

"And even if you could use your text editor of choice to edit GNOME configuration files, it'd be still way more cumbersome than using regedit on windows."

Is there a documentation available to know what registry key is used for what purpose? (I really don't know, that's why I'm asking.)

Text editors are a basic part of every Linux and every UNIX distribution. It's one of the things you can rely everywhere. Sometimes, the simplest ideas are the best ones.

Personally, I like files like the "old", "obsolete" or "abandoned" ~/.gtkrc more than the many directories of XML files. :-) But that's just my personal opinion.

Of course, you need a complex environment of configuration files to map complex settings to. Text files "key=value" won't suffice here in the most cases. So it's up to the developers to choose wisely what representation for the settings is to be used.

As long as the source is with you, you'll have no problem. If it's not, you can only rely on what the developers provide to you. It's their responsibility to do their work good, but of course they can't guess what your imaginations are how something should be solved.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: I say good for Linus
by grat on Tue 20th Feb 2007 16:30 in reply to "RE[3]: I say good for Linus"
grat Member since:
2006-02-02

As a long time user of both KDE and Gnome (with a preference for KDE-- I prefer to customize my desktop within an inch of it's life), this whole debate of whether .kde/ or .gconf/ data structures/contents is simpler or not is missing the point.

If I want to make a change to some feature of the KDE desktop, chances are, that configuration option is somewhere within the KDE Control Center. Whether it's a KDM configuration, the default fonts, KWIN configuration, sound, etc, most likely, it's in the control center.

If I want to make a change to some portion of the gnome desktop, I have to hunt down what utility controls it, discover that the utility that used to let me change that feature no longer does, and then run gconf-editor to get to the "advanced" options. Hopefully, the key I need already exists, otherwise I have to look it up online.

Gnome is getting better. But every time someone says "Oh, edit the XML" or "run gconf-edit", they've demonstrated that Gnome is *not* user friendly to the "typical user".

I don't expect my mother to run regedit32, why should I tell her to run gconf-edit?

Reply Parent Score: 3