Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 7th Dec 2007 06:25 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Qt Jambi ships as a single Java library, or JAR (Java Archive) file, plus a handful of tools, including an interface layout and design tool, and an Eclipse plug-in. Trolltech uses its vaunted Qt C++ library as the GUI engine and puts Java wrappers around it. This approach uses the JNI (Java Native Interface) to call the necessary functions from Java. More here.
Thread beginning with comment 289436
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[9]: Unconvinced
by leos on Fri 7th Dec 2007 21:57 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: Unconvinced"
leos
Member since:
2005-09-21

I laugh at people jumping up and down and telling me that I'm wrong because the Java 6 LAF has finally got around to inheriting the native theme, icons and fonts - after ten+ years! Believe me, that is the minimum that's required from something that purports to allow you to develop desktop applications.


Dude. Chill the hell out. Qt rocks but there are other completely legitimate technologies you can use to develop software. Those others might not be as good for you (and they aren't for me either), but for some people (like mikeurbandz here) they seem to work just fine. Stick to rational arguments instead of these thinly veiled insults.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Unconvinced
by segedunum on Fri 7th Dec 2007 22:26 in reply to "RE[9]: Unconvinced"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Qt rocks but there are other completely legitimate technologies you can use to develop software.

Yes........ And?

Those others might not be as good for you (and they aren't for me either), but for some people (like mikeurbandz here) they seem to work just fine. Stick to rational arguments instead of these thinly veiled insults.

It might very well work for many people, and that's great, but trying to claim that Java has the sort of reasonable desktop integration that makes developing desktop applications widely legitimate is well, well wide of the mark. It really is. It's what has turned many people off developing client applications in Java.

I would have thought people would have heard this debate going on for the past ten years or so. Oh well.........

Reply Parent Score: 4