Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th Feb 2008 22:09 UTC
Internet Explorer Microsoft has sent an e-mail to a select number of its previous beta testers regarding the upcoming release of IE8 beta 1. "We are nearing the launch of Windows Internet Explorer 8 Beta 1 and we will be making it available for the general public to download and test. IE8 Beta 1 is focused on the developer community, with the goal of gaining valuable feedback to improve Internet Explorer 8 during the development process."
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RE[5]: Comment by handy
by MordEth on Wed 27th Feb 2008 05:48 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Comment by handy"
MordEth
Member since:
2006-07-16

Actually, all of those work (at least to display) in Firefox, Opera, and Safari (Webkit). Only Firefox actually seems to like the Space Invaders game, though. Opera displays it (but doesn't let you play), and Safari (Webkit) stopped responding after starting a game.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SVG#Native_support for more information.

Note: I was testing on the nightly build of Firefox 3.0b4; Firefox 2.0.0.12 may not support the Space Invaders game.

It's pretty much a given that standards support for anything is better in any browser other than Internet Explorer. I hate having to support it, especially IE6 (which sadly, a huge percentage of people still use): 17%, 12%, 13%, 13%, and 14%, from the 5 sites on which I have access to Google Analytics data. The ironic part is the last of those sites (with 14%) makes no pretense of supporting IE6 (transparent PNG layout, done via CSS which renders the Javascript PNG fix impossible, plus other CSS IE6 basically does not render), to the point of inserting a H1 warning with text about insecurity and linking to Wikipedia, while urging the viewer to download other browsers. Despite all of this, still it has 14% of its traffic from IE6.

Web developers will still have to support that abomination for years, or get more vocal about "This page refuses to support your browser because..."

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Comment by handy
by sappyvcv on Wed 27th Feb 2008 12:55 in reply to "RE[5]: Comment by handy"
sappyvcv Member since:
2005-07-06

Er, are you talking specifically about SVG or all the W3C standards in the link posted by lemur?

I doubt any browser fully supports ALL of those standards in their latest stable version. The point of the story being, why can you pick out a standard IE doesn't support (X) and cry wolf then ignore that other browsers don't support Y and/or Z?

If current browsers DO support all of those, can you provide a source to back that claim up?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Comment by handy
by lemur2 on Thu 28th Feb 2008 05:47 in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by handy"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Er, are you talking specifically about SVG or all the W3C standards in the link posted by lemur? I doubt any browser fully supports ALL of those standards in their latest stable version. The point of the story being, why can you pick out a standard IE doesn't support (X) and cry wolf then ignore that other browsers don't support Y and/or Z? If current browsers DO support all of those, can you provide a source to back that claim up?


I think more to the point is that (apart from text-only browsers such as lynx) IE is by far the browser that supports the least of the W3C standards.

IE tends to "support" its own non-standards, such as ActiveX, Windows bitmap, WMF and Winforms, rather than the correct device-independent standards for effectively the same functionality.

It is that sort of non-gracious anti-social ant-competitive behaviour that makes life very difficult for web developers, when by rights it should be all standard and well understood and completely browser and platform independent.

It is that sort of non-gracious anti-social ant-competitive behaviour that Microsoft has been called out for once already by the US courts (but somehow escaped any remedy for that), and is about to be called out for it once again this time by the EU.

Reply Parent Score: 2