Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 21st May 2008 00:09 UTC, submitted by RJop
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless OpenMoko, the project that creates not only a Linux operating system for phones but the hardware to run it as well, has announced some major changes to its software stack. Traditionally a Gtk+ endeavour, this is all going to change rather drastically.
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segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

...one of the responses was from someone that was so fundamentally opposed to C++ (claiming it is completely unusable) that he immediately rejected the whole openmoko project based on this switch. I can't see how anyone with such a closed, unyielding mind can call themselves a developer.

This is quite common, sadly. When VLC switched to Qt for their main interface because of the cross-platform benefits (right-to-left languages for one) and because VLC is a real cross-platform open source application, the usual objections of licensing (VLC is still GPLed anyway) and the use of C++ were wheeled out.

People totally misunderstand C++, and have misunderstood a lot of comments people like Linus Torvalds have made about it. There's nothing wrong with C++ itself, but as an object-oriented language you inevitably find yourself using a library like Boost or the STL. This is where pretty much all the problems come from.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Alleister Member since:
2006-05-29

I think the problem rather comes from the fact that you can program in C++ for ten years but still have a hard time taking over code from an C++ developer that has been using it for fifteen years.
There is such a thing as too much complexity and too much freedom. C++ has its uses, but imho application development isn't one of them anymore these days.

I do agree that those ditching a project like OpenMoko for such a switch is an overreaction. You can still keep programs simple, the problem arises if you get that kind of C++ developer on the project who is complicating things for the sake of bragging.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

I think the problem rather comes from the fact that you can program in C++ for ten years but still have a hard time taking over code from an C++ developer that has been using it for fifteen years.


You can say the same thing about Perl, and a lot of languages. Your post sounds generally like a rant against featureful/complex languages. It's not bad to prefer simple, but let's be honest about it.

I think most of the time that the complexity of C is 'hidden'. Most C devs use some good libraries that make annoying things less annoying, which is roughly what you get at the language level from other languages.

That said, I personally prefer C to C++.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Timmmm Member since:
2006-07-25

I think the STL and Boost are well designed. They are certainly easier to use than the equivalent C libraries! Especially std::string. And consider something like sort(). Way simpler with the STL than C.

*And* you get fewer security bugs and memory leaks...

Reply Parent Score: 2