Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Jun 2008 21:09 UTC, submitted by Rahul
Features, Office The battle between the OpenDocument Format and Microsoft's Open Office XML was long, and here and there rather nasty, but it appears as if we finally have a winner. The company behind OOXML already conceded by announcing it would implement support for ODF in Office 2007 SP2, but now it has also said it quite literally: ODF has won.
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RE: Fire and Motion
by Nex6 on Thu 19th Jun 2008 22:04 UTC in reply to "Fire and Motion"
Nex6
Member since:
2005-07-06

I am not so sure,

On one hand your probly right. on the other, native support for ooXML ISO version will not appear until
the next version of office while native support for ODF
ISO version will appear in office 2007 sp2.

we dont even have an alpha on the table yet for the next office version so its at least 3 years away. and thats saying nothing goes wrong at ISO with all the appeals.

and, more and more Gov's are stgart to "back" ODF and PDF. what we have now is a standards war just like with the blue ray vs hddvd...

more and more ODF, is looking like its gaining traction.. but in the end who knows...


my bet would be for ODF.



-Nex6

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Fire and Motion
by segedunum on Thu 19th Jun 2008 22:16 in reply to "RE: Fire and Motion"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

I am not so sure,

Why? Has the last twenty-five years of such software not been enough to convince you?

On one hand your probly right. on the other, native support for ooXML ISO version will not appear until
the next version of office while native support for ODF
ISO version will appear in office 2007 sp2.

There are those of us just about old enough to remember Office's support for RDF. I am so non-plussed by this covering of old ground it isn't even funny. We'll see what complete support future Office versions have for ODF, but past history dictates that you'll have someone create a document in Office, try to save it in ODF and there will be an absolute torrent of warnings about loss of formatting and/or loss of functionality and such a document for the receiver will appear nothing like what the sender intended. Worse, ODF documents produced with other software will be washed through that cycle.

Put simply, Microsoft are going to sit back and implement ODF as-is, they will contribute no features of Office to the format whatsoever and simply throw their arms up in the air when users have formatting issues. When people are forced into saving in OOXML to preserve their formatting and functionality, Microsoft will say "See? That's what users have picked and the market has chosen".

Predictable as hell.

we dont even have an alpha on the table yet for the next office version so its at least 3 years away.

Nice.

Reply Parent Score: 11

RE[3]: Fire and Motion
by Nex6 on Thu 19th Jun 2008 22:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Fire and Motion"
Nex6 Member since:
2005-07-06

I am also, long in the tooth...
and have dealth withsome of the same issues over and over and over again. hell...

I am going thru it now, with some users using there own copys of office 2007 and saving stuff in ooxml and then sending it to the rest of the enterpise and wondering why no one can open it.

I am *hoping* things will be different this time, we can hope can't we? ;)

besides, many people and goverments want ODF, and if microsoft gives them a half assed support for it they wont use it and will instead use OO.o, Iwork, abiword etc which does have good and correct support.

Microsoft, does not really have much choice, this time. thats the beauty of it.



-Nex6

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Fire and Motion
by lemur2 on Thu 19th Jun 2008 23:43 in reply to "RE[2]: Fire and Motion"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

We'll see what complete support future Office versions have for ODF, but past history dictates that you'll have someone create a document in Office, try to save it in ODF and there will be an absolute torrent of warnings about loss of formatting and/or loss of functionality and such a document for the receiver will appear nothing like what the sender intended. Worse, ODF documents produced with other software will be washed through that cycle.


Once again what this would mean is the MSOffice implemented ODF very poorly, and there would be several much cheaper Office suites available which implemented it far better.

Any governement wishing to purchase software via an open tender process (which is normally mandated) would have to reject MSOffice if it did such a poor job of saving to and loading ODF.

Any purchase decision via open tender which did choose the more expensive MSOffice (which also had demonstrable flaws) would very easily be able to be challenged.

Reply Parent Score: 3