Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 26th Jun 2008 21:52 UTC, submitted by Taylor
Mac OS X TestMac.net has published a quick look at Mac OS X Snow Leopard. "The biggest changes are under the hood. Snow Leopard is fast. Very fast. Like, surprisingly fast. From boot times to general application usage, Snow Leopard was noticeably quicker then Leopard when using the same system. Apple and 3rd party applications alike, they all launched faster and performed smoother. I'm sure this can be attributed to the new 64-bit architecture, but its amazing how much of a difference it really is." Screenshots included.
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RE[2]: Comment by zizban
by stabbyjones on Fri 27th Jun 2008 01:21 UTC in reply to "RE: Comment by zizban"
stabbyjones
Member since:
2008-04-15

(in the short time i've been here i've found that staying out of apple/kde conversations is a good idea. my knowledge is debian/windows so it's best left to people who know more than me.)

as far as 10.6 goes it looks like there has been a large amount of optimisation which is something every OS needs as often as possible.

for me footprint is a big issue, leaner code means less things to break and getting almost 1Gb off an install is a big leap. i don't buy hardware to help run bloat so good work apple devs on slimming things up.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Comment by zizban
by kaiwai on Fri 27th Jun 2008 02:18 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by zizban"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

for me footprint is a big issue, leaner code means less things to break and getting almost 1Gb off an install is a big leap. i don't buy hardware to help run bloat so good work apple devs on slimming things up.


I'm wondering whether the space saved is due to the removal of bitmap images which the used to bundle. IIRC, the used to bundle something like 4 difference sized bitmaps - I wonder whether this has been replaced with SVG instead which would negate the need to for it.

It'll also be interesting to see what role the LLVM project has done in terms of optimisation versus bloat. I remember when using gcc, that was one of the things which had to be balanced; you could heavily optimise something, but then have any possible gain destroyed by the fact that the binary was bloated.

I do remember, however, an article on slimming down binaries; there was one demonstrating how much bloat there is, for example, in a simple 'hello world' binary. The article was over several pages, and they removed a whole laundry list of things compiled into it which the application didn't strictly need to function. After removing all the bloat, it was over half the size.

It'll be interesting to find out when Arstechnica does its usual indepth analysis of Snow Leopard.

Reply Parent Score: 1