Linked by Adam S on Tue 8th Jul 2008 12:47 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y In 2006, Microsoft released Windows Powershell, a new command line shell that, via cmdlets, scripts, and executables, allow core system administration tasks to be scripted. While this functionality has been available on Unix-type systems for decades, Microsoft's version will almost certainly, within a few years, be available on several hundred million PCs. So how does the Powershell stack up against Linux favorite bash? MSDN links to this Bash vs Powershell article.
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RE[4]: cygwin
by StaubSaugerNZ on Tue 8th Jul 2008 21:55 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: cygwin"
StaubSaugerNZ
Member since:
2007-07-13

If your scripting language doesn't run *everywhere* then you are wasting your time (unless you a relatively small organisation, in which case any solution would work).

Any big organisation has a lot of all kinds of environments. Plus, whatever you are running on now is not what you'll be running on in the future, so why not future-proof yourself by choosing portable solutions. That is, something other than "fashion-of-the-day" PowerShell.

It makes better business sense to be portable unless you are a "ohh, look, shiny new features" kind-of-guy rather than someone who wants to get stuff done. Plus other (usually less talented) folks be need to be able to maintain your stuff otherwise you'll never be able to be promoted.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: cygwin
by BluenoseJake on Wed 9th Jul 2008 01:42 in reply to "RE[4]: cygwin"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

"If your scripting language doesn't run *everywhere* then you are wasting your time (unless you a relatively small organisation, in which case any solution would work)."

I gotta disagree with you there, I can learn more than one scripting language, and there's lots of ways to move information between 2 different OSs. soap, rpc, email, ftp, sms, html, ODBC, blah blah blah. I'm more interested in capabilities and choice, not conformity.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: cygwin
by StaubSaugerNZ on Wed 9th Jul 2008 04:08 in reply to "RE[5]: cygwin"
StaubSaugerNZ Member since:
2007-07-13

"If your scripting language doesn't run *everywhere* then you are wasting your time (unless you a relatively small organisation, in which case any solution would work)."

I gotta disagree with you there, I can learn more than one scripting language, and there's lots of ways to move information between 2 different OSs. soap, rpc, email, ftp, sms, html, ODBC, blah blah blah. I'm more interested in capabilities and choice, not conformity.


Be a special snowflake, no one asked you to conform. That is not what was being discussed.

In fact, I wasn't talking about what *you* or *I* might like personally. It isn't "all about you". I'm sure you are very capable of learning many scripting languages. The point was that if you had to pick a single scripting language that less-capable 9-to-5ers had to be trained in (as part of their job, and yes the world is full of these people, and surprisingly enough they do have to do scripting from time to time). It would also have to work everywhere since the biggest environments (banks, government ministries, the military) have all sorts of platforms (usually mainframes and proprietary Unix as it turns out). Then the rational choice is not PowerShell.

So yes, we understand that you personally like PowerShell. However, just because it works for your (possibly small-to-medium) problems doesn't mean that works for everyone and everywhere. Other scripting languages will work everywhere, which makes them far more useful than PowerShell. Sure they don't have the easy Windows integration that PowerShell does, but they can still get the job done (on all platforms). Do you now understand why PowerShell isn't the number one recommendation for general use by many people, since I don't wish to labour the point further?

Reply Parent Score: 1