Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 11th Jan 2009 10:54 UTC, submitted by Hiev
Mono Project Arstechnica reports that Mono, an open source implementation of .NET runtime, is bringing Microsoft's development technologies to some unexpected places, including the iPhone, Android, and the Wii.
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adkilla
Member since:
2005-07-07

I am not aware that the .net is depended on the registry, in fact I have heard that .net was a way for microsoft of getting rid of dll/registry hell of COM/ACTIVEX. .net uses largly the GAC (global asembly Cash) for shared components, not the registry. For configuration it uses XML Configuration Files both on framework level as on application level.


First and foremost, the GAC is meant to cache NGENed assemblies and system components. It does not have any registry like functionality. So what are you trying to mean here? You may want to re-read your post.

The XML configuration files and MANIFESTs are mostly static and are meant to make it easy for editing by hand and are for setting configuration before the application loads. Application settings generated during runtime by a majority of .Net apps are stored in the registry.

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Reply Parent Score: 2

Yuske Member since:
2005-07-28

Application settings generated during runtime by a majority of .Net apps are stored in the registry.

The .Net and Mono applicatios work with the App.config file(a XML file that store all the applicaitions settings), it doesn't nee the registry at all, even an amateur would know that.

Please, stop posting already, you are embarazing your self.

Reply Parent Score: 3

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

The .Net and Mono applicatios work with the App.config file(a XML file that store all the applicaitions settings), it doesn't nee the registry at all, even an amateur would know that.

1. An amateur would actually have a clue what App.config is for which is why he wrote this:

"The XML configuration files and MANIFESTs are mostly static and are meant to make it easy for editing by hand and are for setting configuration before the application loads. Application settings generated during runtime by a majority of .Net apps are stored in the registry."


2. The vast majority of .Net applications are ported from the .Net world to Mono. Ergo, you are bound by what goes on in the Windows based .Net world no matter how many times you write "It only uses App.config you luzer!"

3. You have to explicitly use App.config, it isn't required and it is intended for static global application settings. I'm not even sure App.config can be edited programmatically either. It's certainly not well advertised.

4. App.config is something that only an administrator will have access to and shouldn't be written by the application directly. The registry is certainly the only way of reliably getting per-user settings or setting on the fly application settings, or bunging something in Application Data - which is Windows specific incidentally. A spectacular number of .Net apps do this, and Mono needs to handle it otherwise porting is a no-go.

Please, stop posting already, you are embarazing your self.

You're only embarrassing yourself, because if you think that .Net applications all explicitly use App.config for all of their settings (not what it is designed for incidentally) and there is no reason for registry usage in Mono (which there obviously is because you've even been given a link to someone talking of a GTK registry editor to Mono's already built-in registry) then you have no clue whatsoever. Anyone who gives a single thoroughly inciteful comment consisting only of 'Mono rocks' is a few rocks short of a quarry themselves.

Sorry, but porting .Net applications to Mono and other platforms is not as simple as you would so dearly love to make out.

Edited 2009-01-11 19:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

Toad Member since:
2005-11-27


First and foremost, the GAC is meant to cache NGENed assemblies and system components. It does not have any registry like functionality. So what are you trying to mean here? You may want to re-read your post.

Stop implying things, its obvious what I mean - reread what I wrote in that paragraph, I challenge you to find any factual error (here is the paragraph).

I am not aware that the .net is depended on the registry, in fact I have heard that .net was a way for microsoft of getting rid of dll/registry hell of COM/ACTIVEX. .net uses largly the GAC (global asembly Cash) for shared components, not the registry. For configuration it uses XML Configuration Files both on framework level as on application level.



The XML configuration files and MANIFESTs are mostly static and are meant to make it easy for editing by hand and are for setting configuration before the application loads.

You are not truthful, XML configuration files in .net are not limited to static data. Infact there are API to generate events when data is changed in configuration files.

And why are you talking about the MANIFEST? Its usage is for meta-information containing information about the binnary code, and is stored in inside the .exe and .dll, it has nothing to do with Application settings, infact the MANIFEST was invented by microsoft to remove the dependency of the registry, before .net microsoft stored this type of information in the registry (COM/ACTIVEX).

Application settings generated during runtime by a majority of .Net apps are stored in the registry.

Of course you can access/use the Registry from .net, as I am sure you can from JAVA too. And if you do that, your application is limited to Windows regardless if you use Java or .net. I manage a programming group developing in .net. None of our application use the Registry, or needs to use the registry. And if you read what Microsoft recomends, you will see that they recomends that application should NOT use the registry, and in fact allow XCOPY installation.

I was factual in what I wrote, and I acknowledged that some of microsoft implementation of .net depended on the registry and win32. You on the other side have been vague, and some of what you have written has been outright wrong.

Reply Parent Score: 3

adkilla Member since:
2005-07-07

If you are really a pro like you fictitiously claim to be then you would provide some links that back your claim. You have yet to explain why you brought up the GAC which has little to nothing to do with the registry.

FYI the configuration files accessible by System.Configuration have the following drawbacks:
"You use one of the Save methods to write configuration information. Note that the user or process that writes must have the following permissions:

* Write permission on the configuration file and directory at the current configuration hierarchy level.
*Read permissions on all the configuration files."

You can refer to this in this MSDN link:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.configuration.config...

We've had this experience before when attempting to modify the configuration file. But because the user had no permission to write to "Program Files" directory this was not recommended. You cannot assume the user will always be administrator when using your app!

Instead an MVP advised us to use the registry as MS has recommended here:
"This class provides the set of standard root keys found in the registry on machines running Windows. The registry is a storage facility for information about applications, users, and default system settings. For example, applications can use the registry for storing information that needs to be preserved after the application is closed, and access that same information when the application is reloaded. For instance, you can store color preferences, screen locations, or the size of the window. You can control this data for each user by storing the information in a different location in the registry."
Here is the link for that info in the MSDN .Net reference:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.win32.registry.as...

If you do not have any legitimate links to back up your so called facts, then you sir are a charlatan.

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Reply Parent Score: -1

anarxia Member since:
2006-06-02

It's actually very hard to access the registry from Java. You need JNI to do that.

Reply Parent Score: 1