Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 12:04 UTC
Legal Remember when Steve Jobs launched the iPhone, and held it up in the air, proudly proclaiming "Boy, have we patented it", followed by a massive applause of the adoring audience? It may seem like this wasn't just an empty claim, either. During the earnings conference call yesterday, the company hinted at possible legal action against Palm were the Pre to infringe on iPhone patents.
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RE[5]: This just goes to show
by majipoor on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 14:33 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: This just goes to show"
majipoor
Member since:
2009-01-22

So... If pinching can be patented... Does that mean I can patent moving my mouse to the "left" to move my "pointer" to the "left" of the "screen"?

I don't see a difference really.


You can try to patent it and your request will be rejected.

If you are really interested in knowing your facts (are you?), you should google a little bit to know which patents Apple has registered on the iPhone UI or hardware.

AFAIK, they have claimed to have 200+ patents which HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED.

You can argue whether patents are a good thing or not, but I don't see why other company would be allowed to sue over patent infringment and not Apple.

And I'm sure Palm has many patents too and would sue any company if necessary.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: This just goes to show
by spiderman on Thu 22nd Jan 2009 14:49 in reply to "RE[5]: This just goes to show"
spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

The patent on doubly linked lists has been accepted as well:
http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/7028023/fulltext.html
It was accepted in ... 2006!
I learned linked lists in 1997 and they exist since the 70's or before...
It does not mean it is enforceable. It does just mean that no one bothered enough to go and show them the prior art. The patent just stands there and will be invalidated the first time someone tries to sue with it. It happened many times with other frivolous patents. The patent office accepts almost anything and they invalidate it afterwards when someone come to invalidate it.

Edited 2009-01-22 14:52 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4