Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Feb 2009 14:11 UTC
Linux With Linux traditionally coming in many, many flavours, a common call among some Linux fans - but mostly among people who actually do not use Linux - is to standardise all the various distributions, and work from a single "one-distribution-to-rule-them-all". In a recent interview, Linus Tovalds discarded the idea, stating that he thinks "it's something absolutely required!"
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Agree
by Ringheims Auto on Wed 4th Feb 2009 14:31 UTC
Ringheims Auto
Member since:
2005-07-23

I agree with you on the whole, having one (or few) would be pointless, in addition to impossible given that the GPL, and most Free Software licenses, allows it.

Today the short answer, for the most, is Ubuntu. But that is always subject to change, which is a good thing.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Agree
by kragil on Wed 4th Feb 2009 15:00 in reply to "Agree"
kragil Member since:
2006-01-04

Yes, it keeps Canonical honest and on their toes. They have to innovate, integrate and polish like the best.

If they would stop people would run to the distro de jour without hesitation.

Linux users are Linux users for a reason, not because of inertia (windows) or faith/marketing (OSX). (OK OK .. It sounds like flamebait .. but it isn't.)

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Agree
by TLZ_ on Thu 5th Feb 2009 07:15 in reply to "RE: Agree"
TLZ_ Member since:
2007-02-05

Linux users are Linux users for a reason, not because of inertia (windows) or faith/marketing (OSX).

And Linux users are using it only because they are blind zealots?

See how stupid my comment sounds. That's how stupid your comment sounded. This is not Slashdot, you can do better.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Agree
by pixel8r on Thu 5th Feb 2009 02:46 in reply to "Agree"
pixel8r Member since:
2007-08-11

I agree with you on the whole, having one (or few) would be pointless, in addition to impossible given that the GPL, and most Free Software licenses, allows it.

Today the short answer, for the most, is Ubuntu. But that is always subject to change, which is a good thing.


Yep and as someone who doesn't particularly like ubuntu (nothing wrong with it and i do still respect it), I'd still be happy if software writers targetted ubuntu. Other linux vendors could still easily make sure any ubuntu software ran fine on their distro - and indeed 99% of software written for ubuntu WILL run unmodified on most other mainstream linux distros.

We have a standard base, standard libraries, standard filesystem structure (within reason) - so writing linux apps is already pretty easy. I think we're heading in the right direction.

It doesn't please everyone, but if you're really into Linux then you probably like the way things are going more or less.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Agree
by wakeupneo on Thu 5th Feb 2009 04:50 in reply to "Agree"
wakeupneo Member since:
2005-07-06

Today the short answer, for the most, is Ubuntu.


..and it wasn't all that long ago that Ubuntu burst on the scene with the same comments saying "oh no...not another one!"

Survival of the fittest. If a distro comes along that people connect with, it will find its' niche. If not, it will wither and die. As it should.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Agree
by rramalho on Thu 5th Feb 2009 12:01 in reply to "RE: Agree"
rramalho Member since:
2007-07-11

Ubuntu works best with most hardware and is very straightforward. I've been converting Windows users for months - those people without specific needs like AutoCAD's and Photoshop's - and they're loving the experience.

I tried others and just failed. That's the beauty of Ubuntu. It actually works!

Reply Parent Score: 1