Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 2nd Jul 2009 16:17 UTC, submitted by lemur2
Linux The FAT file system is the file system used by MS-DOS and earlier versions of Windows. It's a relatively simple and straightforward file system, supported by just about any operating system, making it the favoured file system on memory cards and the like. FAT is an ECMA and ISO standard, but these only apply for FAT12 and FAT16 without support for long file names, and therein lies a problem.
Thread beginning with comment 371525
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
rramalho
Member since:
2007-07-11

Well...

MS sued Tom-Tom as a PR move, something to scare people from Linux. That way it makes sense to sue for such a non-important piece of technology.

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Well...

MS sued Tom-Tom as a PR move, something to scare people from Linux. That way it makes sense to sue for such a non-important piece of technology.


Either that or make it where they require Linux distributors to pay Microsoft $5 per user for a FAT licence but only charge them $5 per unit for a Windows CE licence which gives them a ready to use operating system to customise (rather than having to assemble everything from the ground up). Making Linux expensive enough as to persuade companies to use Microsoft's software.

I wonder therefore whether it would be best for EU to then demand that FAT/exFAT to be classified as so important to the IT world that Microsoft should be forced ring fence those technologies with full documented specifications to allow royalty free implementations. It would fit perfectly into the requirements of the EU competition laws which place higher level of responsibility on those corporations which have a dominant position in a given market.

Reply Parent Score: 2

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

There is no need to document FAT. It's such a simple file system that we are 100% sure we have toe correct implementation. Also, there are no software patents in the EU. The problem is only for the USA.

I believe the best route for the EU would be to force MS to include open file system drivers out of the box with Windows, like ext4 or whatever, but something that is open and documented. That way manufacturers could release devices with open file systems and be compatible with Windows. All other OSes can include it with no problem.

Hopefully, it would be too expensive for Microsoft not to release the same drivers all other the world with Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 2