Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Jul 2009 21:20 UTC
Internet & Networking A day earlier than expected, Microsoft has released version 3 of its Flash alternative Silverlight, including a number of related tools to aid in Silverlight development. It comes with a whole lot of new features.
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RE[6]: Wow
by lemur2 on Fri 10th Jul 2009 02:53 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Wow"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

Except there is no standardized codec now for video watching with HTML5...so its going to be another cluster. How many different implementations and bastardizations will there be? (again, NO standard) Hell, when is HTML5 actually going to be finished? Its been worked on since what...originally 2004 and 2007? So in 2015 it might be finished?


It is exactly as "finished" as proprietary interests have allowed it to be.

It isn't through lack of trying, or any fault with HTML5, that proprietary interests have held it up from being approved.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Html5
"HTML 5 was initially said to become a game-changer in Web application development, making obsolete such plug-in-based rich Internet application (RIA) technologies as Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and Sun JavaFX. Such applications would be made obsolete by specifying a standard video codec for all browsers to use. However, in July 2009, the editor of the burgeoning draft specification announced the dropping of Ogg Theora, the open standard, due to opposition from Apple, as well as the rival H.264 codec due to opposition from other browser vendors. This means HTML 5 does not currently specify a common video codec for Web development."


In other words, there is nothing wrong with HTML5 other than that some big proprieatry vendors feel they won't be able to rip people off enough. In other words, the only thing missing from HTML5 being complete is the specification of the codec.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogg_controversy

Not to worry though, HTML5 + Ogg Theora and Vorbis codecs will work today in Firefox, and it will soon also work in:

"Opera Software and Mozilla have been advocates for including the Ogg formats into the HTML standard and have included native decoding for these formats in their browsers. Google is planning on including Vorbis and Theora support in Chrome."


... Opera and Chrome as well as Firefox.

Almost 50% of the desktop web browser market will support it, even though it isn't an official endorsed standard.

PS: I have heard that there is an open source project under way right now to create an ActiveX plugin for IE that would add support for HTML5 and Ogg format codecs.

Opera and Firefox represent a huge slice of the non-desktop-platform web browser market as well.

Edited 2009-07-10 03:06 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[7]: Wow
by anduril on Fri 10th Jul 2009 02:57 in reply to "RE[6]: Wow"
anduril Member since:
2005-11-11

Funny, know who's name wasnt listed in what you quoted? Microsoft. Have we heard anything from them about it? No, don't think we have. No reason Microsoft wont be supporting it with their "increased" push towards support web standards (and as still sub-par as IE8 is compared to its competitors in some areas, it IS an improvement) I dont see any reason why it WONT support ogg

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: Wow
by lemur2 on Fri 10th Jul 2009 03:04 in reply to "RE[7]: Wow"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Funny, know who's name wasnt listed in what you quoted? Microsoft. Have we heard anything from them about it? No, don't think we have. No reason Microsoft wont be supporting it with their "increased" push towards support web standards (and as still sub-par as IE8 is compared to its competitors in some areas, it IS an improvement) I dont see any reason why it WONT support ogg


Microsoft's self-interest is, of course, to try to make it so that one has to have Silverlight in order to be able to view rich multimedia web content. This would give Microsoft control over which devices could, and which could not, view rich multimedia content via the internet.

Nothing could be further from the spirit and as-designed intent of the internet itself.

Fortunately, I have heard that there is a project underway right now which has the aim to make an ActiveX plugin for IE that would support (at least) HTML5 and Ogg Theora/Vorbis codecs.

Despite Microsoft's recalcitrance, it might not be possible for Microsoft et al to stop an open internet with respect to rich multimedia content.

Just say NO to Flash and Silverlight.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Wow
by greatbob6 on Fri 10th Jul 2009 04:50 in reply to "RE[6]: Wow"
greatbob6 Member since:
2009-07-09

It is exactly as "finished" as proprietary interests have allowed it to be.


This is my point exactly...whenever you are trying to get people to agree (especially companies) and you don't have one entity with the power to make an absolute decision then things start to stagnate. Everyone just has their own best interests at heart.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[8]: Wow
by lemur2 on Fri 10th Jul 2009 05:03 in reply to "RE[7]: Wow"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"It is exactly as "finished" as proprietary interests have allowed it to be.
This is my point exactly...whenever you are trying to get people to agree (especially companies) and you don't have one entity with the power to make an absolute decision then things start to stagnate. Everyone just has their own best interests at heart. "

I'm hoping that the internet "audience" may in fact end up vetoing the veto (as it were) of the self-interested companies that have tried to stop HTML5/Theora.

No company, or group of companies, can be allowed to control which devices and platforms can render rich web content.

I'm betting that user demand will see the companies recalcitrance off eventually. It will be either: provide the open web, or don't be a player.

Edited 2009-07-10 05:03 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2