Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 4th Aug 2009 10:43 UTC
SuSE, openSUSE SUSE Linux used to be a very KDE-centric distribution. Then Novell came around, bought SUSE and Ximian, and slowely but surely they turned the now-openSUSE distribution into effectively a GNOME-centric distribution with KDE as its sidekick. The openSUSE community, however, doesn't appear to be particularly happy with KDE being a sidekick.
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Mark Williamson
Member since:
2005-07-06

The reduction in distributor commitment to KDE has made me sad for years now. Before Novell bought SuSE there was a proper, big name, well-supported distro based around KDE. Mandrake/Mandriva was another, although not quite so big. I seem to recall some hints of discord among key employees when Novell switched the SuSE desktop to GNOME. I certainly wasn't happy to see yet another distro become primarily GNOME-based, when I could already choose Fedora / RHEL / Ubuntu for that.

Kubuntu ... well, it's good that you can get the Ubuntu package set whilst also getting KDE. But realistically, developments happen first on vanilla Ubuntu, the development direction is pushed by them and the Kubuntu developers just don't seem to have the resources to cope. Users expecting "Like Ubuntu but based around KDE" will be disappointed, despite the literal truth of the statement. I have had trouble with bugs under Kubuntu's KDE but I'm hesitant to blame too many of these on the distro given the hacked-about nature of my ancient install. On the plus side, Kubuntu does typically offer packages of new KDE releases very quickly.

Overall, though, it feels a bit like the market moved away from what was a strong section of userbase for partially political reasons (e.g. in this case Novell wanting to leverage their Ximian investment, not the existing investment in SuSE/KDE they had purchased) :-(

Reply Score: 4

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Overall, though, it feels a bit like the market moved away from what was a strong section of userbase for partially political reasons (e.g. in this case Novell wanting to leverage their Ximian investment, not the existing investment in SuSE/KDE they had purchased) :-(


With Novell you can almost understand ... by buying Ximian they ended up with a fair amount of sway with regard to GNOME, but almost none over KDE.

I have no idea why Canonical opted with GNOME however. KDE is where the "wow" is undoubtedly at.

Not to worry, there will be some good KDE options re-emerging soon ... Mandriva (now) and PCLinuxOS (one day they will go to KDE4, but they haven't as yet) for RPM-based distros, Fedora has a good KDE option, and MEPIS (one day they will go to KDE4, but they haven't as yet) for a solid Debian-based distro.

Linux Mint 7 ‘Gloria’ KDE has just been released (based on Ubuntu 9.04 and KDE 4.2.4).

http://www.linuxmint.com/blog/?p=986
http://www.linuxmint.com/rel_gloria_kde_whatsnew.php

I am about to trial that one when the torrent finishes downloading.

For cutting edge (rolling release) "roll-your-own" KDE4 distros, try Sabayon or ArchLinux KDEmod.

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05566
http://forum.sabayonlinux.org/viewtopic.php?f=60&t=17483

http://chakra-project.org/

Reply Parent Score: 2

vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

I have no idea why Canonical opted with GNOME however. KDE is where the "wow" is undoubtedly at.


It's pretty clear why they opted for Gnome - this decision was made long before Qt license change, like it was for all the other distros.

Focusing on kde 4 would be a gamble well worth making at this point in time. It's not going to happen with Suse/Novell, though.

Not to worry, there will be some good KDE options re-emerging soon ... Mandriva (now) and PCLinuxOS (one day they will go to KDE4, but they haven't as yet) for RPM-based distros, Fedora has a good KDE option, and MEPIS (one day they will go to KDE4, but they haven't as yet) for a solid Debian-based distro.


Sadly, all these hobbyist distros (apart from Fedora) are pretty irrelevant in the big picture. Ubuntu has the mindshare, community, ...; so the popularity of KDE 4 will live or die with Kubuntu. And it's not like working together to improve Kubuntu is forbidden by Ubuntu code of conduct.

Here's to hoping that Kubuntu will rock on 10.04 LTS.

Reply Parent Score: 6

KugelKurt Member since:
2005-07-06

The reduction in distributor commitment to KDE has made me sad for years now.

That's totally false. Distributor support was not reduced, but rather shifted.
Pardus is a relatively new distro that fully supports KDE. Western users may not have heard about it. It's a Turkish distro. Several people work full time on it.
KDE also has a great reputation on Arch with KDEmod.

I have had trouble with bugs under Kubuntu's KDE but I'm hesitant to blame too many of these on the distro given the hacked-about nature of my ancient install.

No, it really is Kubuntu to blame. Kubuntu has the buggiest KDE packages I know of. No Kubuntu release ever shipped with non-broken translation files for KDE. KDE also is less stable there.

Reply Parent Score: 7

Mark Williamson Member since:
2005-07-06

"The reduction in distributor commitment to KDE has made me sad for years now.

That's totally false. Distributor support was not reduced, but rather shifted.
"

Well, you may disagree but I really meant that total distributor resources seem to have reduced. There are smaller distros providing a good KDE experience, which is good, it's just a shame that the really big financial backers of the project seem to have switched resources to GNOME to a greater or lesser extent.


Pardus is a relatively new distro that fully supports KDE. Western users may not have heard about it. It's a Turkish distro. Several people work full time on it.
KDE also has a great reputation on Arch with KDEmod.


I've heard good stuff about Pardus, yeah.


"I have had trouble with bugs under Kubuntu's KDE but I'm hesitant to blame too many of these on the distro given the hacked-about nature of my ancient install.

No, it really is Kubuntu to blame. Kubuntu has the buggiest KDE packages I know of. No Kubuntu release ever shipped with non-broken translation files for KDE. KDE also is less stable there.
"

Right. I seem to recall, quite early on, a (the?) lead Kubuntu developer complaining about the lack of commitment from the Canonical mothership, so I've always had the impression they were somewhat overworked / understaffed.

I've seen various visual problems I see with my KDE4 also blamed on Kubuntu's version of the packages.

I have been considering using Konstruct to build KDE from source, rather than rely on their packaged version. I wonder if it's becoming worth it.

Can't afford to reinstall my desktop machine right now but on my netbook I run Mandriva - it's a heavy distro in RAM usage and disk usage (not ideal for a netbook) but it has a good KDE and excellent support for that hardware. I couldn't run Mandriva on my desktop though, it seems to have packages for too few of the apps I'm interested in.

I used to run KDE on Fedora using RPMs from the KDE-Redhat project and found that reasonable. The main awkwardness about Fedora in those days was that I couldn't figure out a way to enable MP3 support under KDE *without* using the kde-redhat RPMs. The other thing which niggled was that all of the config software they provided was GNOME-based, although it did have the nice feature of being usable on the terminal too.

Reply Parent Score: 2

No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

As I've said before: Debian. Their focus is equal for KDE and Gnome, since Debian's development model is distributed. Wherever they've got a talented and motivated bunch of developers taking care of the packages, Debian's support is top notch, and the developers taking care of KDE are obviously very good at what they do.

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

As I've said before: Debian. Their focus is equal for KDE and Gnome, since Debian's development model is distributed. Wherever they've got a talented and motivated bunch of developers taking care of the packages, Debian's support is top notch, and the developers taking care of KDE are obviously very good at what they do.


To get cutting edge Debian with a KDE4 desktop, perhaps the easiest method is to download and install Sidux.

http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=05580

http://sidux.com/module-News-display-sid-519.html

Edited 2009-08-04 14:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4