Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 26th Aug 2009 18:08 UTC
Oracle and SUN "Sun Microsystems' product plans are up in the air pending its acquisition by Oracle, but the company's chip engineers continue to present new designs in the hope they'll see the light of day. At the Hot Chips conference at Stanford University on Tuesday, Sun presented plans for a security accelerator chip that it said would reduce encryption costs for applications such as VoIP calls and online banking Web sites. The chip, known as a coprocessor, will be included on the same silicon as Rainbow Falls, the code name for the follow-on to Sun's multithreaded Ultrasparc T2 processor."
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RE[2]: Again and again...
by segedunum on Wed 26th Aug 2009 23:37 UTC in reply to "RE: Again and again..."
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

You're always going to bet on the third-party in that scenario because there's any number of ways in which they can improve performance, and there are already good accelerators around right now. From a commodity perspective it remains to be seen whether Sun's approach performs better than a x86 system dedicated for the purpose.

It's an ultra-niche and ultimately fruitless selling point when you consider the competitors that are already there and doing it.

Edited 2009-08-26 23:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Again and again...
by jwwf on Thu 27th Aug 2009 02:36 in reply to "RE[2]: Again and again..."
jwwf Member since:
2006-01-19

You're always going to bet on the third-party in that scenario because there's any number of ways in which they can improve performance, and there are already good accelerators around right now. From a commodity perspective it remains to be seen whether Sun's approach performs better than a x86 system dedicated for the purpose.

It's an ultra-niche and ultimately fruitless selling point when you consider the competitors that are already there and doing it.


So it's a fruitless selling point when there are competitors who base all of their selling on the same point? If you are already buying SPARC, I can't see how not having to spend any money on a third-party board could be considered a bad thing.

I don't see how this is any different than a UNIX vendor back in the day bundling a volume manager. It may not be the best one, but it relegates the dedicated third party product (eg Veritas) to the niche, not the other way around.

Same deal with integrated video. I bet integrated video chews up a third of nvidia's potential market by the mere virtue of being there.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Again and again...
by segedunum on Thu 27th Aug 2009 10:12 in reply to "RE[3]: Again and again..."
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

So it's a fruitless selling point when there are competitors who base all of their selling on the same point?

Yes. The phenomenon of trying to push yourself into a niche selling point because of other difficulties you have where there are already existing and established players makes life very, very difficult.

If you are already buying SPARC, I can't see how not having to spend any money on a third-party board could be considered a bad thing.

SPARC is a niche market, so it's hardly going to attract more people to using SPARC which is what Sun need. However, I'd like to see some figures from Sun as to how much business they expect to gain by targetting existing SPARC users who know they need SSL accelerators and already have them installed. It's easier just to get yourself more powerful hardware if you want to cut costs and can get away with it.

The research, development and production costs versus the potential returns on this seem more and more non-sensical the more you think about it.

I don't see how this is any different than a UNIX vendor back in the day bundling a volume manager.

You've hit the nail on the head with that statement. It's rather like what a Unix vendor would do about fifteen years ago to justify the cost of their own hardware and software. Unfortunately, with the proliferation of cheap and powerful commodity x86 hardware, cheap storage and freely available storage management subsystems like LVM, software RAID and ZFS, as well as very general purpose storage like Amazon's S3, that strategy has ultimately become a totally fruitless exercise that has put many big Unix vendors out of business.

...it relegates the dedicated third party product (eg Veritas) to the niche, not the other way around.

When you're using it as a strategy to try and sell a declining platform the opportunities for success are pretty limited. Sun have always had some very strange ideas about what it is that they're trying to commoditise. More powerful x86 hardware and cost reasons have already relegated coprocessors and on-chip processing of specific protocols to a niche market themselves. Trying to compete in an already niche market is doomed to failure.

Same deal with integrated video. I bet integrated video chews up a third of nvidia's potential market by the mere virtue of being there.

Possibly, but graphics is a large and expanding field in itself with ever expanding requirements that has some way to run yet. You might get total onboard and on-chip graphics at some point in the future, but that is some way off. SSL and encryption/decryption acceleration is certainly not like that so the comparison is rather flawed.

Reply Parent Score: 2