Linked by Kroc Camen on Fri 1st Jan 2010 15:36 UTC
Opera Software HTML5 Video is coming to Opera 10.5. Yesterday (or technically, last year--happy new year readers!) Opera released a new alpha build containing a preview of their HTML5 Video support. There's a number of details to note, not least that this is still an early alpha...
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Comment by cerbie
by cerbie on Sat 2nd Jan 2010 10:04 UTC
cerbie
Member since:
2006-01-02

I hope we get more people going with H.264, instead of Theora (where are the patent hounds coming after all the poor x264 users? *crickets*). This looks very good: "We don't care what codec it is, as long as Gstreamer can demux and decode it."

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by cerbie
by Kroc on Sat 2nd Jan 2010 10:56 in reply to "Comment by cerbie"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

That was sarcasm, right? You would actually prefer a 'Web where if you want to put a video on your own website, the legal eagles have the full right to swoop down on you and demand money for it? Yeah, that'll be just great for everybody. We already have the audio-police suing people for having a radio on within earshot of a human being, the last thing we need is the video police targetting bloggers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by cerbie
by modmans2ndcoming on Sun 3rd Jan 2010 07:14 in reply to "RE: Comment by cerbie"
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

last I checked, h264 licenses costs were made against the tool makers, not the tool users.

If I make an h264 video, I don't have to worry about licensing costs... the browser vendor does.... and now that windows, Mac and Linux support h264 playback, I think it is moot.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Comment by cerbie
by lemur2 on Sat 2nd Jan 2010 11:22 in reply to "Comment by cerbie"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I hope we get more people going with H.264, instead of Theora (where are the patent hounds coming after all the poor x264 users? *crickets*). This looks very good: "We don't care what codec it is, as long as Gstreamer can demux and decode it."


Why would you hope for h264? I think it is next year (2011) when the patent owners of h264 have said they will start charging everyone for each "transmission" (their word) of data encoded using a h264 encoder. The intent is apparently for a charge to be applicable not just each time someone uses the h264 codec to compress a video stream ... but rather every time someone "transmits" a h264-encoded stream!

http://www.streaminglearningcenter.com/articles/h264-royalties-what...

According to the “Summary of AVC/H.264 License Terms,” which you can download from the MPEG LA site (www.mpegla.com/ avc/avc-agreement.cfm), there are no royalties for free internet broadcast (there are, however, royalties for pay-per-view or subscription video) until Dec. 31, 2010. After that, “the royalty shall be no more than the economic equivalent of royalties payable during the same time for free television.”

...
So the most likely result will be a yearly fee per broadcast market, which may be the internet as a whole, but, logically, it could also be applied on a per-country basis. In the case of my multinational equipment manufacturer client, which has more than 25 international subsidiaries, each with its own website, the potential royalty charge exceeded $250,000. When I outlined my findings with the client, it was clear that this would be a major factor in its decision to change over to H.264.


Theora 1.1 (previously codenamed Thusnelda) achieves virtually the same performance as h264, but it is utterly free to use by anyone, anytime, for encoding, decoding or streaming, forever.

http://www.theora.org/news/
http://hacks.mozilla.org/2009/09/theora-1-1-released/

Edited 2010-01-02 11:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Comment by cerbie
by silix on Sat 2nd Jan 2010 12:16 in reply to "RE: Comment by cerbie"
silix Member since:
2006-03-01

what's with this craze about Theora? it's not like it' s able to give such a better visual quality than other codecs, and it' not the only open and royalty free one, either (at least Dirac comes to mind)

so why force one particular format onto the web, instead of letting content distributors choose whether "transmitting" in a recognized industry standard format (and pay the royalties), or going the free and open route (but forcing viewers to transcode in order to see the same content -people often uses content grabbers like Orbit, you know- on their standalone player -many a players fully support H264, they don't do theora instead)

after all, it's them who will actually be the one charged for the aforementioned royalties, not those surfing the web...

Edited 2010-01-02 12:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Comment by cerbie
by cerbie on Sat 2nd Jan 2010 19:33 in reply to "RE: Comment by cerbie"
cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

I did not know that. Well, screw H.264, then. I rather think the way Fraunhofer did MP3 was awfully good, and promoted wide use. Royalties per transmission will be a good way to choke it off, and doing so after it's been out and become popular will foster only the best PR.

I think it's insane that we have IP law systems that will even allow that sort of licensing, too. A cost for an encoder and/or decoder, if you're out to sell it to somebody, is entirely fair. A cost for that, and for making content and/or using it? No. Participation costs BAD. It is not analogous to something like TV, where there is ongoing content creation, and service maintenance, that basically doesn't exist on the side of the video format guys.

Edited 2010-01-02 19:44 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by cerbie
by cerbie on Sat 2nd Jan 2010 19:41 in reply to "RE: Comment by cerbie"
cerbie Member since:
2006-01-02

"Theora 1.1 (previously codenamed Thusnelda) achieves virtually the same performance as h264, but it is utterly free to use by anyone, anytime, for encoding, decoding or streaming, forever."

This, though, is still a bit of an issue, and will remain one. That statement is 100% false. Any modern nVidia card can even show that to be false under Linux+X with common software (AMD as well, in Windows). I'm not sure how that hurdle will be handled, in the future (GPGPU decoder programs?).

Reply Parent Score: 2