Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 6th May 2010 21:05 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu The recently released 10.04 version of Ubuntu is the third Long Term Support (LTS) version Canonical has released. I installed this new version on four of my laptops (2 netbooks, 1 normal laptop, 1 portable desktop replacement), and here's my impression of it.
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RE[5]: lethal upgrade
by lemur2 on Fri 7th May 2010 07:00 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: lethal upgrade"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

I'm not looking for a Linux distribution, I only periodically test Linux distros out of curiosity to see how much they have progressed. My opinion is that Linux is not ready for the desktop and upgrade issues are a major factor. It's fine for the server


Just on the topic of suitability for the desktop, comparing Ubuntu with Windows, I have an illustrative anecdote that people may wish to comment on.

My sister-in-law and her son both bought new Windows laptops recently, one for work and the other for school. The laptops wouldn’t work with their existing inkjet printer, and they asked me if I could help. I googled the model of the inkjet printer, and of course the only driver available was for XP, and wouldn’t install on either of their new laptops. So they had to buy a new printer.

They asked me to buy a new printer, and then set it up for them. I got an inexpensive HP PSC, and they were happy with that, because it gave them a scanner also, which they did not expect to get. On opening the box, I found instructions to REFRAIN from plugging in the new printer, but rather I had first to put in a DVD and let it auto-run to install a driver. Luckily, both of the laptops did have a DVD drive, I would have been (temporarily) snookered if they had bought netbooks. After a lengthy process of installing numerous adware applets, finally it came time for the driver itself to install, and I had to plug in the printer. All went well, the new printer was recognised, and there was only a re-boot required and a few dozen nag screens to negotiate, and I had to clean up the desktop a bit of the icons that had been littered there by the install process.

That was for my sister-in-law’s laptop. I had to do it all over again for her son’s laptop.

It was a nice printer though (apart from all the adware) and inexpensive, so I also bought a new one for my own family. In contrast to Windows: I took it home, got it out of the box, put in the ink cartridges, plugged in the USB cable and power cord, turned it on, and 20 seconds later an Ubuntu dialog box popped up saying that the new printer was recognised, the correct driver was identified (it was already installed), the correct default page size for my country (A4) was selected, and the printer was now ready to print. The scanner function worked also. The HP utility worked as well, allowing me to check ink levels and clean ink heads and print test pages, etc. What is more, the same happened on three different machines ... ready to print each time in 20 seconds even though the printer had never been connected to that machine before.

It is crystal clear to me which of these OS systems is better for use on the desktop for average people, and unequivocally it isn't Windows.

Edited 2010-05-07 07:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: lethal upgrade
by strcpy on Fri 7th May 2010 08:57 in reply to "RE[5]: lethal upgrade"
strcpy Member since:
2009-05-20

It is crystal clear to me which of these OS systems is better for use on the desktop for average people, and unequivocally it isn't Windows.


Just keep that tiring Linux advocacy going and the world will care. Right.

Remember to put some M-dollar-signs there to make it more convincing.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: lethal upgrade
by darknexus on Fri 7th May 2010 09:11 in reply to "RE[6]: lethal upgrade"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Ah, here we go with the Linux v. Windows debates again. *Sigh*. Are you people that insecure that you can't just use what os works for you but have to argue the same old tired lines back and forth? The funny thing is that, of late, the Windows people seem to be getting more into it than the Linux people. I can remember a time not so long ago when it was the other way around. Amusing.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[7]: lethal upgrade
by lemur2 on Fri 7th May 2010 10:12 in reply to "RE[6]: lethal upgrade"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

" It is crystal clear to me which of these OS systems is better for use on the desktop for average people, and unequivocally it isn't Windows.


Just keep that tiring Linux advocacy going and the world will care. Right.

Remember to put some M-dollar-signs there to make it more convincing.
"

This, people will notice, has absolutely nothing to do with the point. A blatant attempt at deflection, nothing more.

The point being that the "desktop experience" with Ubuntu was vastly superior to that with Windows, in every way. Installing the OS, booting it, running it, updating it, upgrading it, keeping it free of malware, keeping it free of nags and from ads begging for your money, keeping it tidy and running smoothly, adding functionality ... whatever you name, the experience is better with a good Linux distribution.

BTW, as far as updates goes ... here in Australia, ISPs like to charge a fortune for bandwidth. This is offset somewhat by ISPs offering local mirrors for some files which do not count towards bandwidth usage. My own ISP is Internode, and this is their "unmetered" mirror site:

http://mirror.internode.on.net/
http://mirror.internode.on.net/pub/

There is a choice of twenty or so Linux distributions mirrored here, so one can choose from any of those and updates can be downloaded "unmetered".

There is no mirror, however, you will notice, for "Windows Updates". These have to be downloaded from a Microsoft server.

In Australia, if you have a low data cap, such as for a mobile broadband USB modem for example, you simply cannot afford to keep that Windows system updated. It would cost you a fortune in Internet bandwidth fees.

Once again, the experience with Linux is vastly superior.

Edited 2010-05-07 10:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[7]: lethal upgrade
by nt_jerkface on Fri 7th May 2010 14:17 in reply to "RE[6]: lethal upgrade"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


Remember to put some M-dollar-signs there to make it more convincing.


Don't forget to add condescending remarks and anecdotal stories involving relatives. They should be mixed in with a few disingenuous statements for maximum effect.

But rule #1 when it comes to Linux advocacy is to never admit that an area needs work.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: lethal upgrade
by Morgan on Fri 7th May 2010 11:06 in reply to "RE[5]: lethal upgrade"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I have one of those HP printers too (DeskJet F2400) and I was pleasantly surprised when I put Ubuntu 10.04 on a partition and had left the printer plugged in. I never got a dialog at all, so I assumed I'd have to do some tinkering. I opened up the Printer utility and there it sat, saying "ready"! I printed a test page with no problem at all, then I opened Simple Scan again expecting to be disappointed. I put a business card on the glass and clicked the scan button, and soon enough saw the card on my screen. I was simply floored!

Even on my Leopard install, I had to use the crappy HP software to be able to print and scan, so I give the Ubuntu team major props for doing something far better than even the great Mac OS.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: lethal upgrade
by lemur2 on Fri 7th May 2010 13:31 in reply to "RE[6]: lethal upgrade"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I have one of those HP printers too (DeskJet F2400) and I was pleasantly surprised when I put Ubuntu 10.04 on a partition and had left the printer plugged in. I never got a dialog at all, so I assumed I'd have to do some tinkering. I opened up the Printer utility and there it sat, saying "ready"! I printed a test page with no problem at all, then I opened Simple Scan again expecting to be disappointed. I put a business card on the glass and clicked the scan button, and soon enough saw the card on my screen. I was simply floored!

Even on my Leopard install, I had to use the crappy HP software to be able to print and scan, so I give the Ubuntu team major props for doing something far better than even the great Mac OS.


Ubuntu is great for this kind of thing. Absolutely fantastic.

http://ourlan.homelinux.net/qdig/?Qwd=./KDE4_desktop&Qif=kubuntu_lu...

OTOH, there is an attraction to having a cutting-edge-right-up-to-date-yet-rarely-breaks distribution like Arch. Arch takes a bit of tinkering (for things like setting up a new printer) where Ubuntu makes it easy, but IMO Arch has got Ubuntu beat for being super-slick.

http://ourlan.homelinux.net/qdig/?Qwd=./KDE4_desktop&Qif=my-arch-de...

It works amazingly well, and very fast, considering how much stuff you can install at the very-latest version.

Edited 2010-05-07 13:50 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: lethal upgrade
by ggiunta on Fri 7th May 2010 21:01 in reply to "RE[5]: lethal upgrade"
ggiunta Member since:
2006-01-13

It has to be said that drivers for hp all-in-one are such a pos that they cannot be described in words. Requiring .nyet, a whopping 350mb download, completely unstable and using an unfathombale number of ports to communicate with the networked printers - but still not being able to overcome a simple router

Reply Parent Score: 2