Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 11th May 2010 10:45 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless While most of us here on the OSNews team are proponents of HTML5, we're all fully aware that Flash serves an important role on the web today, and will most likely continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Flash has a rather spotty record when it comes to performance, and so far, hasn't been able to run well on mobile devices. It seems this is about to change, as an Adobe evangelist has showed off Flash 10.1 on Android 2.2 (Froyo) running on the Nexus One. And eerlijk is eerlijk, it looks pretty darn impressive, especially considering how far they've come.
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Hilarious
by jackeebleu on Tue 11th May 2010 11:27 UTC
jackeebleu
Member since:
2006-01-26

You mock Steve Jobs for his comments on Flash, then agree with him on Flash's foibles, make up your mind, you are beginning to look a bit silly.

Reply Score: 0

RE: Hilarious
by Thom_Holwerda on Tue 11th May 2010 11:33 in reply to "Hilarious"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

You mock Steve Jobs for his comments on Flash, then agree with him on Flash's foibles, make up your mind, you are beginning to look a bit silly.


I agree with Jobs that up until now, the released versions of Flash have been abysmal in both performance as well as security.

However, contrary to many other people, I'm capable of changing my convictions if I see that a product is improving. I've tested Flash 10.1 beta/RC releases on both Windows and Linux, and they are MILES better, performance-wise, than previous releases.

There is nothing "silly" about being honest about that. Sure, I could go down the dishonest route, and simply not report on Flash' improvements, but for that kind of reporting, you better go to MacDailyNews.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Hilarious
by kristoph on Tue 11th May 2010 16:58 in reply to "RE: Hilarious"
kristoph Member since:
2006-01-01

Yes but given that you rail against H264 don't you think that Flash as a whole is a much bigger problem?

I mean the codec debate is mainly about playing video. Flash makes the whole web experience proprietary, locked to one vendor, and essentially restricted to platforms that vendor chooses to support.

That's bad right, real bad.

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Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Hilarious
by kaiwai on Tue 11th May 2010 11:55 in reply to "Hilarious"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

You mock Steve Jobs for his comments on Flash, then agree with him on Flash's foibles, make up your mind, you are beginning to look a bit silly.


Um, I read the article and Thom quite clearly states that Flash had problems *IN THE PAST* but now things have improved. You know, how about assessing something based on the present rather than what happened 10 years ago.

More important Steve Jobs has no right to dictate what a person can and can't load onto their iPhone; I find it funny that so many here whine about how terrible it is but has it stopped them from going out and purchasing an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch? If a person wants to load on Flash than it is there right - the moment that the device leaves the store, the customer owns it. If owning it involves the desire to install a battery sucking, CPU hogging, bandwidth hogging, browser crashing plugin, then so be it.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Hilarious
by mrhasbean on Tue 11th May 2010 13:25 in reply to "RE: Hilarious"
mrhasbean Member since:
2006-04-03

If owning it involves the desire to install a battery sucking, CPU hogging, bandwidth hogging, browser crashing plugin, then so be it.


And then scream like a banshee at the DEVICE creator because their battery melts after 10 minutes or the device gets rooted and someone buys 10k worth of goodies using their credit card details that were stored on the thing.

Joe and Joanne Lunchbucket will NEVER blame the software for these things, it will ALWAYS be the hardware, and therefore the company that makes the hardware. Anyone with significant experience in computer support knows this, it's always "this stupid computer", never "this stupid program". Apple achieve their customer satisfaction levels by creating environments that, for their target audience, just work. And yes, sometimes that makes them restrictive in areas, but that's their market. Expecting them to change their successful model to please the minority who either don't or won't use their products anyway is just foolish.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Hilarious
by Cody Evans on Tue 11th May 2010 14:02 in reply to "RE: Hilarious"
Cody Evans Member since:
2009-08-14

the moment that the device leaves the store, the customer owns it.


Under Apple's EULA, by using the device, you agree that you don't own the device and that your leasing it from Apple. And in the US, the EULA has the same legal standing as a signed contract...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Hilarious
by Tony Swash on Tue 11th May 2010 15:27 in reply to "RE: Hilarious"
Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

Um, I read the article and Thom quite clearly states that Flash had problems *IN THE PAST* but now things have improved. You know, how about assessing something based on the present rather than what happened 10 years ago.

More important Steve Jobs has no right to dictate what a person can and can't load onto their iPhone; I find it funny that so many here whine about how terrible it is but has it stopped them from going out and purchasing an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch? If a person wants to load on Flash than it is there right - the moment that the device leaves the store, the customer owns it. If owning it involves the desire to install a battery sucking, CPU hogging, bandwidth hogging, browser crashing plugin, then so be it.


You do realise that this is all academic so far because Adobe have failed to released a version of Flash that can run on any phone let alone the iPhone?

Lets see - As a responsible company with a responsible attitude to your customers do you:

(a) promise to open your platform to some as yet unreleased piece of software (from a company with a history of releasing buggy inefficient version of the same software on the desktop) on a wing and prayer based on some vapourware demo that shows a buggy piece of crap

- or -

(b) say "no thanks we pass on that one"

And before people start with the "installing flash is my human right" type of pomposity remember that the bulk of iPhone users, when browsing the web and confronted with "you need to click here to install flash plugin to view this site" message, will probably click OK. Then they will wonder why their iPhone is running so slowly, and why it keeps crashing, then blame Apple for selling them a piece of crap.

Why do people in places like OSNews, who apparently are so devoted to openness, spend so much time defending a monopolistic and unnecessary piece of proprietary shabbiness like Flash?

Reply Parent Score: 1