Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 19th May 2010 16:28 UTC, submitted by bnolsen
Multimedia, AV Yes, I broke my own rules and used a "breaking" modifier for this story (let me have my fun for once). Here we have it, as the rumour mill suggested, Google has released the On2 VP8 video codec as open source (royalty free, BSD-style), while also launching the WebM container format which combines a VP8 video stream with Vorbis audio. Support for WebM has been enabled on YouTube's HTML5 beta, and you can download patches against ffmpeg as well as DirectShow filters for Windows (Gstreamer plugins are labelled as "coming soon"). Mac users are out of luck for now; no QuickTime plugins have been announced yet. Update: The WebM blog is now open - and the list of partners is pretty decent already. It includes ARM, NVIDIA, AMD, Qualcomm, and many others. Update II: VP8 will be baked into Flash. Update III: The Opera labs version with WebM support has been released too, for Linux, Mac, and Windows.
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RE: patent pool
by daveak on Wed 19th May 2010 17:30 UTC in reply to "patent pool"
daveak
Member since:
2008-12-29

Yes very premature. Plenty of devices have hardware support for h264. How many have VP8 support?

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[2]: patent pool
by WereCatf on Wed 19th May 2010 17:42 in reply to "RE: patent pool"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Yes very premature. Plenty of devices have hardware support for h264. How many have VP8 support?

They most likely have a generic DSP which can be re-programmed. Those are available in large quantities and aren't very costly. Whereas developing a DSP which can ONLY support H.264, both in hardware and in software, would cost quite a lot and benefit nothing.

As such, it is quite possible it would be perfectly possible to add support for VP8 to existing hardware. The problem then again is that manufacturers don't want to introduce new features in old devices; they want you to buy a new one. So, don't expect your old devices to get support for VP8 because of no hardware support; expect it not to get support because of manufacturers being greedy.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[3]: patent pool
by daveak on Wed 19th May 2010 17:49 in reply to "RE[2]: patent pool"
daveak Member since:
2008-12-29


As such, it is quite possible it would be perfectly possible to add support for VP8 to existing hardware. The problem then again is that manufacturers don't want to introduce new features in old devices; they want you to buy a new one. So, don't expect your old devices to get support for VP8 because of no hardware support; expect it not to get support because of manufacturers being greedy.


Exactly, support will be confined to new hardware, or a small selection of older hardware. Add the issue of people not updating their firmware (firmware? what's that?) and you end up a distinct lack of current devices supporting the format.

Reply Parent Score: 1