Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 9th Aug 2010 10:47 UTC
Humor Now that I'm done with my internship and ready to take on OSNews again, I figured it'd be nice to start off with something light-hearted. I just read that Google bought an unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with a camera, ready to photograph whatever it flies across. We may consider Google's biggest threat to be privacy, but with all this computing power they have, their Street View cars, and now, unmanned flying drones, they look more and more like SkyNet to me. So, what's your most likely apocalyptic scenario?
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RE[7]: Comment by Kroc
by Zifre on Tue 10th Aug 2010 16:47 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Kroc"
Zifre
Member since:
2009-10-04

In the dark ages the king had the authority, but it was the church that had all the power. Now that had flipped that the state has the authority, but the corporations have the power. Money has more influence over us than government. Who I am has been shaped by commercialism far more than laws that are present that most people don’t break anyway. The government defines the outer boundary, and the corps define what happens in the middle.

I think this is a perfect summary of exactly what is happening to the world.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by Kroc
by Novan_Leon on Tue 10th Aug 2010 21:08 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by Kroc"
Novan_Leon Member since:
2005-12-07

I'm just curious. Can you give me an example of a non-monopoly corporation having power over your life without you having a say in the matter?

Edited 2010-08-10 21:10 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[9]: Comment by Kroc
by Zifre on Tue 10th Aug 2010 23:08 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by Kroc"
Zifre Member since:
2009-10-04

I'm just curious. Can you give me an example of a non-monopoly corporation having power over your life without you having a say in the matter?

For the most part, no single corporation has all that much power over a person. However, their collective power is huge. You can decide, "I'm not going to deal with Walmart at all". But you can't decide, "I'm not going to deal with any stores at all". And if you don't have the money or time to go to the better, more specialized store (or if that store went out of business because of Walmart), then you might just have to deal with Walmart anyway. Even so, corporations rarely have a large influence on an individual - it's their collective influence on our culture that is too large. The main problem is that most people don't care if their money, power, and rights are taken away by corporations - as long as they can continue to buy their cheap junk.

Reply Parent Score: 2