Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 21:36 UTC, submitted by google_ninja
Internet & Networking Now this is a subject sure to cause some discussion among all of you. LifeHacker's Adam Pash is arguing that Chrome has overtaken Firefox as the browser of choice for what he calls 'power users'; polls among LifeHacker's readership indeed seem to confirm just that. He also gives a number of reasons as to why this is the case.
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Comment by ssokolow
by ssokolow on Fri 24th Sep 2010 01:08 UTC
ssokolow
Member since:
2010-01-21

I switched to Chrome about a year ago but recently switched back to Firefox for the following reasons:

1. Chrome's memory consumption with many tabs is apalling.

2. Firefox, with the right mix of extensions and XUL userscripts, can be made to feel close enough to Chrome's responsiveness and minimal UI to satisfy me while also providing extra functionality.

3. Google kept making arbitrary decisions I didn't like and refuses to provide an equivalent to about:config. (eg. The removal of "http://" from the address bar without even an attempt to make a reasonable justification for it)

4. After several years, Chrome's Omnibar history search is still at least an order of magnitude slower than the Awesomebar. (5 to 15 seconds as opposed to 0.5 to 1.5 seconds to return results)

5. Google's API, while very nice for limiting the ability of developers to make a mess of the browser, also makes extension developers dependent on Google to enable things like CS Lite, NoScript, UserAgent Switcher, Video DownloadHelper, an AdBlock Plus that prevents the ads from being loaded in the first place, etc.

Some of the things I want which Google has refused to implement despite user demand:
- An option to re-enable single-click selects all on Linux
- Vim-style /-triggered find-as-you-type (Despite forcing Linux users to triple-click select in the name of matching platform behaviour)
- A toggle to bring back http:// in the address bar (How am I supposed to choose between copying http://www... and www... to the selection or clipboard?)
- An option to warn when closing multiple tabs (Chrome devs apparently hate modal dialogs even when they're justified)

...not to mention the trivial fixes they've been dragging their heels on like making blur() and focus() actually work in some fashion.

Basically, too many straws on one camel's back. Firefox has its warts (Needing an extension to use the scroll wheel to switch tabs, anyone?) but at least they can be fixed without maintaining my own C++ patch set. It's MY computer and MY browser and Google needs to remember that. It also helps that Firefox stable doesn't leak its way up to 3GiB of memory usage the way Chrome stable does.

(It also helps that I've got "Hide WinDeco" set to WinKey+T on my WM so a little Stylish XUL hackery is all that's needed to get Chrome-style Fitts's Law-compliant top-row-active tabs)

Reply Score: 3

RE: Comment by ssokolow
by lemur2 on Fri 24th Sep 2010 01:57 in reply to "Comment by ssokolow"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

makes extension developers dependent on Google to enable things like CS Lite, NoScript, UserAgent Switcher, Video DownloadHelper, an AdBlock Plus that prevents the ads from being loaded in the first place, etc


There is now adequate but not complete support in Chrome for "An Adblock Plus that does not download ads", but AFAIK there is no support in Chrome for, and hence no equivalent to, Video DownloadHelper.

Vim-style /-triggered find-as-you-type


This is a great feature of Firefox that I also enjoy in KDE's Okular (a PDF viewer). It beats the hell out of typing "Ctrl-f" leading to a dialog box.

Edited 2010-09-24 02:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2